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Welcome to iCTLT 2016!
Wednesday, March 30
 

9:00am GMT+08

Opening Ceremony & Address by Guest-of-Honour
Wednesday March 30, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am GMT+08
Main Hall (404AX#,405BX - 406CX) Suntec City Convention Hall

10:00am GMT+08

Keynote 1: Michael Fullan
Speakers
avatar for Michael Fullan

Michael Fullan

Professor Emeritus, Education in Motion
Michael Fullan, OC, is the former Dean of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. Recognized as a worldwide authority on educational reform, he advises policymakers and local leaders around the world in helping to achieve the moral purpose of all... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am GMT+08
Main Hall (404AX#,405BX - 406CX) Suntec City Convention Hall

11:00am GMT+08

Morning Tea Break
Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 022 Understanding Resonance Graphs using Easy Javascript Simulationrs (EJsS) and Why We Use EJS
This paper reports a computer model- simulation created using Easy JavaScript Simulation (EJsS) http://www.um.es/fem/EjsWiki/ for learners to visualize how the steady-state amplitude of a driven oscillating system varies with the frequency of the periodic driving force. The simulation shows (N=100) identical spring-mass systems being subjected to (1) periodic driving force of equal amplitude but different driving frequencies and (2) different amount of damping. The simulation aims to create a visually intuitive way of understanding how the series of amplitude versus driving frequency graphs are obtained by showing how the displacement of the system changes over time as it transits from the transient to the steady state. 

A suggested “how to use” the model is added to help educators and students in their teaching and learning, where we explained the theoretical steady state equation, time conditions when the model starts allowing data recording of maximum amplitudes to closely match the theoretical equation and steps to collect different runs of degree of damping. 

We also discuss two design features in our computer model: A) displaying the instantaneous oscillation together with the achieved steady state amplitudes and B) explicit world view overlay with scientific representation with different degrees of damping runs. 

Three advantages of using EJsS include 1) Open Source Codes and Creative Commons Attribution Licenses for scaling up of interactively engaging educational practices 2) models made can run on almost any device including Android and iOS and 3) allows for redefining physics educational practices through computer modeling.

Webpage to share:

http://iwant2study.org/ospsg/index.php/interactive-resources/physics/02-newtonian-mechanics/09-oscillations/88-shm24

Download and unzip for offline use: 

http://iwant2study.org/ospsg/index.php/interactive-resources/physics/02-newtonian-mechanics/09-oscillations/88-shm24


Or click this link to run the model:

http://iwant2study.org/lookangejss/02_newtonianmechanics_8oscillations/ejss_model_SHM24/SHM24_Simulation.xhtml

Source code editable using EJS 5.1 and above: 

http://iwant2study.org/lookangejss/02_newtonianmechanics_8oscillations/ejss_src_SHM24.zip

ICTLT slides
https://youtu.be/dK5kel4fXOE
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dK5kel4fXOE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


Video poster:
https://youtu.be/hau_qAkTMzw

Moderators
avatar for LAWRENCE WEE

LAWRENCE WEE

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
@lookang

Presenters
CC

CHARLES CHEW

Academy of Singapore Teachers
DW

DARREN WONG

Ministry of Education



Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

11:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 241 Transforming Culture of Learning in the Digital Age
To support the vision of 21st century learning, Institute of Technical Education (ITE) had established a digital education culture throughout ITE students’ learning journey that enables all lecturers and students to stay connected on and off campus; collaborating with peers, creating knowledge, managing learning and monitoring progress. ITE has been developing substantial frameworks over the years to adopt technology-enhanced learning to engage, motivate, and inspired learners of all ages. In 2000 to 2004 under ITE Breakthrough strategic plan to create a world-class technical education institution for a knowledge-based economy, our curriculum was redesigned to create an IT-based teaching and learning environment for our students. Our first learning management system, eTutor, was implemented in 2002 to focus on the pillars of connectivity and accessibility. We had built a community of connected on-line learning campuses that allowed our students to access course material anywhere, anytime. Lecturers were trained to develop interactive courseware for self-directed learning. In 2005 to 2009 under ITE Advantage strategic plan to propel ITE into a global leader in technical education, our education became a key pillar to stay competitive in Singapore workforce and economy. ITE had developed the taxonomic role-play pedagogic model, iDe’Lite, for teaching and learning of Service Skills using video-based technology. Lecturers used various video editing, screen capture and screen recorder software to develop self-taught video content to inculcate students’ independent learning. Finally, in 2015 to 2019, the new ITE strategic plan - ITE Trailblazer had aspired to blaze new trails in teaching and learning, through use of ICT-enabled and teaching methods tailored to different disciplines. New learning management system, MyConnexion, is implemented. It provides a greater flexibility to engage both lecturers and students in teaching and learning with a more user friendly interfaces that encompasses various Web 2.0 collaborative tools. ITE has started BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) program in some of the courses from 2014 to 2015. The transition to mobile devices and digital curriculum redefine our educational approach through greater incorporation of info-comm technology, reinvent our learning spaces, and adopt discipline-specific teaching methods. Every ITE student will have more opportunities for authentic, flexible and self-directed learning, both in and out of ITE. This will prepare them to be active, skilled, creative, and ethical contributors to the global economy.

Presenters
CY

CHOW YUEN CHOY

Institute of Technical Education
DC

DANIEL CHOO

Institute of Technical Education
IL

IRENE LEE

Institute of Technical Education
YC

YANG CHING KAI

Institute of Technical Education



Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

11:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 309 Promoting Reading of Chinese Books Through Teachers' Modelling and Students' Participation in Online Community for Reading
Reading is a source of comprehensible input which may contribute significantly to a general language competence that underlies both spoken and written performance (Krashen, 1989). Reading helps learners to acquire language naturally. If students read more and enjoy it, they will become better readers (Gardiner, 2005).

However, it is challenging to promote reading of Chinese language (CL) books among students in Singapore. A recent survey affirmed that students would not read CL books if given a choice.

To alleviate this issue, an approach known as “Sustained Silent Reading through Modeling and Structure (MSSR) with ICT” by Chien, Chen, Ko and Chen (2011) was piloted in four primary schools since 2014, and has since scaled to nine other primary schools in 2015. The key principles of this approach are: 1) reading is fun; 2) reading is done in a conducive, joyful and stress-free environment, with teachers modeling sustained silent reading alongside students in class; 3) ownership of reading and choice of books are upon the students, not on the teachers; 4) after-reading activities, like face-to-face discussions and multimodal book recommendations in the online portal, are voluntary.

To further encourage ownership and sustainability of reading, each student is assigned a virtual bookshop to manage in the “Read & Share@MyBookShop” online portal. This portal comes with a point system to reward “high-performing bookshop managers”, who have read and recommended books in their respective bookshops to “sell” to their peers, via different modes of presentation, for example, using texts, drawing, and/ or audio/ video recording. Every time a peer adds a recommended book to his to-read list, this manager has “sold” a book and earns points as rewards. Points awarded can be used to exchange for items to decorate the virtual bookshop to attract more peers to come by and “purchase” recommended books.

Such activities are more motivating and engaging than submission of pen-and-paper book records. Moreover, teachers and students have become members of an online community of reading. The social interactions within the community enable members to sustain their interest in reading and sometimes even widen the genres of book students are usually accustomed to.

Preliminary findings show that MSSR can motivate students in reading more CL books as they learn by imitation. However, more data is required to conclude whether the online portal and community for reading can foster and sustain the interest and habit in CL reading for primary school children.

Presenters
LJ

LEE JO KIM

Ministry of Education
LT

LOW TAN YING

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
SY

SOH YAN PENG

Ministry of Education
SH

SOON HONG LIM

Ministry of Education



Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

11:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 480 Collin's World: Applying Digital Game Design Principles to Build Empathy and Peer Support Skills
There is a growing interest in using digital game-based approach beyond academic subjects to teach character and social skills. In particular, role-playing games provide a simulated environment for players to experience realistic social situations and to solve complex problems. The design principles in role-playing games that can support learning of social skills are as follows: 1) engage the students with narrative, 2) use information to solve complex problems, 3) provide consequences and choices, and 4) provide feedback on their actions in a simulated world (Squire, Jenkins, Holland, Miller, O'Driscoll, Tan, & Todd, 2003). 

This presentation introduces Collin’s World, a new digital game designed to build empathy and peer support skills in students to manage the issues they face online. The main character, Collin is a friendly and helpful student in a Singapore school. His classmates feel comfortable talking to him when they run into difficulties online, e.g., excessive gaming, buying things online safely, cyber bullying and caring for their friends’ online safety. In this game, students will take on Collin’s identity and go through scenarios where they can decide whether or not to help their friends. The game will unfold base on the decisions they make. Sometimes, they can enter Brain World to complete mini-quests. These quests help them to gain tools and knowledge to manage these online challenges. The presentation will include the key features of the game, focusing on how they are based on game design principles and how schools are using the game to build empathy and peer support skills. In addition, the team will share the project evaluation and some preliminary findings.

Presenters
DN

DALTON NG

Ministry of Education
LP

LIEW PEI CHIN

Ministry of Education
NP

NEDUMARAN PRABAVATHY

Ministry of Education, Singapore
TL

TAN LILY

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ



Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

11:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 531 Sustaining Professional Learning for Technology Use in the Classroom
This e-poster documents a case study of ICT Good Practices @ Schools program, and captures the narrative in five stages namely (i) The Challenge, (ii) The Design, (iii) The Insights, (iv) The Re-designed, and (v) The Study.

In Singapore, there were various platforms for schools to share their approaches, strategies on ICT planning and implementation. However, the good practices shared may not be translated into their existing school practices, resulting unevenness of ICT practices at the ground level.

With this challenge, it prompts the conceptualization of Good Practice-Adapting Practice (GP-AP) Schools Learning Programme to help schools adapt and sustain good ICT practices. The design of the GP-AP Schools Learning program involves the following phases: (i) create knowledge – build community knowledge about the practice upon contextualisation, (ii) develop networks – form Communities of Practice (CoPs) across various subjects to explore ICT in common areas of focus, (iii) learn and develop practice – design, enactment and refinement of classroom experiences through action research, and (iv) take action as a community – engage in learning conversations with ETD, NIE and Schools to link theories to practice and promote evidence-based practices.

The evaluation of GP-AP Schools Learning Program was conducted through interviews and feedback from the school teams, NIE partners and ETOs supporting the school teams. These gave rise to insights on the need to provide differentiated support for teachers, and the importance of school leadership to sustain ICT practices.

With these insights, it prompted a re-designed frame to the GP-AP Schools Learning Program. Two new aspects i.e. empowered school team and sustainable ICT practices in MOE were introduced, giving rise to the re-designed program - ICT Good Practices @ Schools (iGPS). Such efforts will be captured through a study which aims to understand the teachers’ design process. It also aims to study the role of technology in deepening student learning.

Presenters
avatar for FARLINAH SUPAAH

FARLINAH SUPAAH

Educational Technology Officer, Ministry of Education, Singapore
Farlinah Supaah is an educational technology professional developer and consultant for the Educational Technology Division within the Ministry of Education, Singapore. With 19 years of teaching experience under her belt, including 7 years as a Head of Department in Information Technology... Read More →
GJ

GOH JIANG WEE ALAN

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
GC

GRACE CHOY PUI MAN

Ministry of Education



Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

11:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 555 Learning Chemistry with wRiteFormula
This e-poster shares how the use of a mobile app game, wRiteFormula, has enhanced the teaching and learning of ionic compound nomenclature, a topic that students often find complicated and confusing.

When taught through the traditional approach of didactic instruction, drill-and-practice exercises, and delayed, generic feedback from the teacher, students are unmotivated to practice using nomenclature rules effectively and efficiently. This results in students’ poor working knowledge of the “grammar” of chemistry that hinders their ability to communicate and impedes their progress in learning chemistry (Chimeno, Wulfsberg, Sanger, & Melton, 2006; Kavak, 2012; Wirtz, Kaufmann, & Hawley, 2006).

To address these issues, the team incorporated game features into wRiteFormula as gamification has been shown to arouse students’ interest and motivate students (Bunchball, 2012; Kavak, 2012). In wRiteFormula, progressive difficulty levels systematically introduce nomenclature rules, and immediate, specific, actionable feedback is provided for mistakes. All games are recorded in an online content management system (CMS), thus the teacher can review a students’ performance at any time. More importantly, the teacher can control the game difficulty level through the CMS.

Instead of the traditional approach, teachers used a discovery-learning approach adapted from Wirtz et al. (2006). First, the teacher set the game difficulty level, and students played several rounds of the game. Next, students worked in small groups to discuss their observations and attempt to elicit the relevant ionic compound nomenclature rules based on the games played. Thereafter, the teacher facilitated a class discussion to consolidate students’ learning. The teacher then increased the game difficulty level, and the cycle repeated until students had deduced all the necessary nomenclature rules.

Both students and teachers provided positive feedback regarding the use of wRiteFormula for learning and teaching ionic compound nomenclature. Students found the game fun and challenging, while teachers found it easier to facilitate discussions and address misconceptions when they did not have to constantly provide feedback to students.

wRiteFormula was developed in an eduLab project with funding from the National Research Foundation, Singapore jointly managed by the Educational Technology Division (ETD), Ministry of Education (MOE), Singapore and the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. The project team comprised teachers from Ang Mo Kio Secondary, Ngee Ann Secondary, Peicai Secondary, Raffles Institution, and the Technologies for Learning Branch, ETD, MOE, Singapore.

Presenters
CP

CHIA PEI XIAN

Ministry of Education
QY

QIU YIRU

Ministry of Education
TC

THONG CHEE HING

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ



Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

11:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 628 Teaching and Learning Guidelines for the Use of ICT in Pre-School Centres

MOE drafted a set of teaching and learning guidelines for the use of ICT in pre-school centres. The draft guidelines provide position statements with regard to teacher’s use of ICT in the classroom for children from 4 to 6 years. Based on the belief that children learn best when they engage in concrete, hands-on experiences and quality interactions, the teacher’s role is critical in ensuring that the use of ICT is thoughtful and intentional. The presentation would highlight the important findings from the literature and country scans which have informed the drafting of the guidelines. Examples of meaningful and appropriate use of ICT in pre-school classrooms and considerations to safeguard children’s health and social emotional well-being would also be shared at the presentation.


Presenters
CJ

CHAN JINGJING

Ministry of Education
JC

JULIET CHIA SUET LING

Ministry of Education



Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

11:00am GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Microsoft
Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 1/1: 633 So You Think You Can Search?
Limited Capacity seats available

There are 40,000 searches conducted per second on Google.com. Access to information is now so critical as humans are always in “search mode”. This database of intentions is changing all the time, and knowing how to search effectively is now a mandatory digital skill.

In Education, the notion of the “Googleable vs. Un-Googleable” question means educators have to be asking the right questions, to challenge students to do more than just Googling the answer. How do we ask the Un-Googleable question to drive more inquiry, to foster collaboration and empower students to have fun while researching? This session will showcase ways that educators have used the tools to engage with students in their classroom, and to spark them on their way to digital literacy.

Presenters
avatar for Suan Yeo

Suan Yeo

Head of Education, ANZ, Google


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 310 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 1/2: 016 Beyond 1-To-1; Redefining The Classroom Learning Spaces
Limited Capacity seats available

Since its inception in 2009, lessons at the School of Science and Technology, Singapore (SST), have been conducted in a 1-to-1 computing environment. Staff members are well-versed in ICT-enabled pedagogies, integrating applied learning as schoolwide teaching practice. 

There is impetus to provide research opportunities and enhancements through both its physical infrastructure and pedagogical approaches. The world of consumer technologies has advanced exponentially. The advancements and their effects influence not just the way people work, play and learn, but also impact how teachers incorporate technology to plan, customise and deliver teaching pedagogies suited to students’ needs. The present reality set us asking, “How can we capitalise on advancement in consumer technology to inject flexibility and student autonomy into the learning environment while engaging students?”

Over a term, we observed what teachers and students do in the classrooms and scanned for possible technologies to supplement the learning activities. Students surveyed reveal they want more group work and engagement in meaningful discussions and intellectual sparrings. This resulted in The Beta Lab Project and our key Research Question: How does the use of a re-designed technology-enhanced classroom make thinking more visible in a Future School in Singapore.

Employing the principles of design-based theory, the project investigates how advancements in consumer technology can redefine teaching and learning in the classroom. We consulted two key works - (i) the seminal Project Zero study by Harvard Graduate School of Education and (ii) Ritchhart’s book on Making Thinking Visible (MTV). The experimental group comprises twenty-five mixed-ability students taught by six subject teachers in the BetaLab designed with a robust digital display system and colour-coded collaborative furniture. Ethnographic classroom observations, survey responses, participant interviews and artefacts serve to triangulate data collected. We examine if lessons taught in a re-designed technology-enhanced classroom incorporating thinking routines will necessarily strengthen applied teaching and learning dispositions, practice and metacognition designed to promote students’ understanding.

The aim of the lessons in the BetaLab seek to:
a) embrace self-directed and collaborative learning, 

b) focus on learning as a process, and

c) making learning visible in different products (e.g., text, comics, podcasts). 

In all, the study seeks to inform teacher-practitioners, school leaders and policymakers of a possible design and implementation model for the next generation classroom setup. We will also share some challenges we faced and our plans for future research bearing that the results are inconclusive at this first cycle of investigation.

Presenters
avatar for AURELIUS YEO JIEN YOEN

AURELIUS YEO JIEN YOEN

HOD Educational Technology, School of Science and Technology
Aurelius is a tech news junkie and a geek, who loves tinkering with gadgets. He is a Google Certified Innovator, a Google Educator Group Leader and an Apple Distinguished Educator. He has been sharing and training teachers in the use of technology in classrooms.
avatar for Dean Ang Ngee Keng

Dean Ang Ngee Keng

Senior Teacher, School of Science and Technology, Singapore
Dean Ang is  a senior teacher in Computing, in the School of Science and Technology, Singapore (SST). Dean is spearheading the new GCE O Level computing subject in SST. As a dedicated Mathematics teacher for 17 years, if he is not meddling with technology, he will be toying with... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 327

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 1/3: 131 How Can Self-Directed E-Learning Be Made More Efficacious: A Case Study Through A Science E-Learning Module For Secondary Three Students
Limited Capacity seats available

E-learning is increasingly being used in schools. It comes in the form of online packages, often consisting of content-heavy Powerpoint slides given to students that are to be read and understood without assistance. While efficient, students struggle with insecurity caused by delayed feedback and a lack of face-to-face interaction. This is compounded by weak engagement and retention of learning content not directly taught by teachers. As E-learning frequently exists in isolation from other academic programmes, students are often disengaged and seek to only complete the task. In addition, there are no structures in place to consolidate or assess the learnt content, or to clarify misconceptions. As a result, student motivation to complete E-learning is also very low.

These issues result in teachers finding that students lack confidence in the topics taught even after E-learning packages have been completed. This has led us to ask fundamental questions: How can an E-learning package be designed to reduce insecurity in students used to teacher-directed teaching? Also, how can an E-learning package ensure deep learning if it is designed to be self-contained and not situated in a broader topic or approach?

We in Hua Yi Secondary School tackled these issues with an effective E-learning package. We will share our design considerations in our approach taken with 4 Secondary Three Express classes, who went through a two-stage intervention on the Chemistry chapter of Air and the Environment:

The first stage (Autonomous Learning Stage) involved students having to go through 5 days of home-based E-learning. We designed the package to consider student agency, accessibility, visibility and extensibility. Each student spent 1½ hours each day tackling E-Learning packages. After 5 days, students were asked to provide feedback about the packages.

The second stage of intervention (Consolidative Stage) took place after the teachers consolidated feedback for learning from the work submitted through Google Forms and EDpuzzle in the first stage. Tests were also administered to assess students' learning.

This two-stage intervention was well-received. Students were able to better understand and retain the concepts, and exhibited self-directed learning as they completed the tasks provided. The success of this E-learning package arose from the use of multiple modes of representation to engage both left-brain and right-brain learners. Having a clear understanding of the role of E-learning is critical for future learning, and the pedagogical considerations underpinning the design of the second stage will be shared and discussed in detail.

Presenters
CW

CHIANG WAI KIT

Hua Yi Secondary School
KW

KHOO WEI LUN EDWIN

Hua Yi Secondary School
TK

TAN KA SHIN

Hua Yi Secondary School
WS

WONG SU MAY

Hua Yi Secondary School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 328

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 1/4: 034 Digital Curation: An Alternative Assessment To Educate High School Students In Responsible Internet Usage
Limited Capacity seats available

The internet is a digital jungle that teenage students must learn to navigate in order to harvest its fruit.  Digital curation is one tool in which we harness to educate students on the responsible use of internet to learn, be self-directed and collaborate. It is a special form of blogging in which students receive an input stream of data generated in accordance with a predefined set of keywords and then carry out their own filtering by selecting the data which in the student's opinion are suitable to be included in his/her collection (Rivki et al., 2012). Different curated streams may also interact, thus forming meaningful networks.

In this study, we employed digital curation as both a form of alternative assessment and learning activity.   Students were divided into groups of 3-4 and given a paper directing their projects. They were given two topics in their Mathematics syllabus to curate. Pearltrees (http://www.pearltrees.com) was used as the curation tool by students.   Students selected digital resources from the web and collate them into a group known as a collection.  By sharing this collection, students collaborated by adding or deleting items from this collection by dragging and dropping them.  A list of rubrics was given to guide students on what they should include in their collection. This platform also provides a means for teachers to monitor students’ progress as the links for their collections (which were works in progress) were shared with teachers.  

Students discovered through this project that there is a vast amount of information related to their topics.  Students also realised that it was easy to copy and paste from the web into their collections. However, to do well in the project, they had to scrutinise each resource to decide which best fulfilled the objectives of the project and arrange their chosen resources in a coherent manner that was easy to understand.  In the final part of the project, students were asked to justify why they chose a digital resource over another to include in their collection.

The end result was that students learned to collaborate in a digital environment and became responsible internet users, constructing his/her knowledge through discussions and exercising intellectual care in the choice of resources. 

The presenters would take participants through the design, implementation and challenges faced in this case study.

Presenters
SY

SEE YEOW HOE

National Junior College
YX

YONG XIN YING

NATIONAL JUNIOR COLLEGE


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 329

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 1/5: 147 Technological, Pedagogical And Content Knowledge (TPACK) In Teachers' Professional Development Of Assessment For Learning (AfL)
Limited Capacity seats available

In recent years, there is an increasing trend in using technology for assessment. TPACK serves as a useful framework to guide teachers to integrate technological affordances with pedagogical approaches for specific subject matter to be taught and assessed. Most technology-enabled assessments typically provide more than one assessment function and thus, they make it easier and quicker for teachers to gauge students’ understanding in their lessons. However, there is a lack of clarity on the role technology plays in assessment and how it adds value to the assessment process. This presentation features the unpacking of TPACK to help teachers design ICT-enabled lessons and reframe the use of technology in assessment.

 

The school designed a year-long stepwise structured training programme to level up teachers’ competencies in assessment design and how they can leverage technology to support AfL in their lessons. The first stage of the training programme involved the unpacking of the discursive meaning of AfL and teachers were taught strategies to improve, enrich and promote the enjoyment of learning in students. A customised AfL lesson plan template was designed to guide teachers. The teachers then designed within their department level possible AfL lesson packages.

 

With the increasing use of TPACK to strengthen ICT practices in schools, it is essential to understand the relationship between TPACK, technological knowledge (TK), pedagogical knowledge (PK) and content knowledge (CK). The next stage helps teachers develop connections between TK, PK and CK. The school adopts a simple integrative approach where TPACK is viewed as a simple combination of TK, PK and CK and the interaction of the three fundamental forms of knowledge bring about pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), technological content knowledge (TCK) and technological pedagogical knowledge (TPK).

 

The training programme focussed on TCK, TPK and TPACK where teachers were tasked to design lessons infused with ICT in groups and then identify which integrated forms of knowledge their lesson belonged to. With a better understanding on how technology can be infused into their pedagogical approach and content delivery, the teachers were then introduced ICT tools to facilitate AfL in the classroom. At the last stage of the training programme, ICT tools such as Nearpod, Rubistar and Edpuzzle were introduced to support AfL strategies like providing effective feedback and sharing of learning outcomes. In conclusion, the TPACK framework is a generative model with many possible future applications in assessment.

Presenters
TH

TANG HUI BOON

Compassvale Secondary School
TS

TENG SIEW LEE

Compassvale Secondary School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 330

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 1/6: 125 Use Of Visualisation To Enhance Inquiry-Based Learning Of Geography
Limited Capacity seats available

Geographical inquiry encourages questioning, investigation and critical thinking about issues affecting the environment and people’s lives. Students must be provided with the opportunities to learn the skills required through practice and engagement in geographical inquiry.

Currently students are taught to comprehend, interpret and evaluate geographical data from a variety of sources, mainly in text form. A number of questions are given by the teacher for them to answer, with reference to the data from the sources. Students are not able to appreciate how, when a number of indicators (or values) are given, and when the values of these indicators change overtime, and across different regions and countries for comparison, will students be able to ‘see’ the inter-relationships and inter-connectedness of these indicators and their impacts on the environment and people. 

The purpose of using visualization, and in particular, the use of Gapminder, hopes to engage and motivate students in Inquiry-based learning. The power of Gapminder lies not only in its ability to graph a wide variety of indicators but also the story that the graph tells over time. Through visualization, students to be able to tell or narrate the story that the graph shows. The narration includes identifying and locating relevant data and exercising reasoning through interpreting and analysing data. Further extension of their discussion will include the impacts of these factors on people, economy and the environment. 

Students will ask a series of geographical questions and to seek to answer by looking at possible causes, impacts and even strategies. They also learn how to support their answers with evidences from source.
This is one example where students study the relationship between income per person and life expectancy.

Study the relationship by:

1. Describing the relationship. Students can see how these 2 variables  change over time from the last century to the present.

2.     Explaining the relationship between variables.

3. Comparing one country (eg. LDC like Bostwana with a DC like Singapore) with another.

We also want students to be able to generate higher order thinking questions through their observations of the trends or statistics like questions that focus on cause-effect, prediction, etc.

To this end, while the use of Gapminder as a visualization tool is powerful in facilitating collaborative discussion and learning through inquiry, students will be able to generate meaningful or higher-order thinking questions in the process. Samples of the questions generated by the students will be shared.

Presenters
OB

OH BOON TECK

Anglo-Chinese School (Barker)


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 333 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 1/7: 127 A Case Study Of Singapore Secondary Art Teachers’ Use Of WebQuest To Enhance Students’ Visual Literacy
Limited Capacity seats available

Recent educational researchers have illuminated the positive impacts of technology on teaching and learning. Despite these studies, little research exists on how the Internet enhances classroom teaching in art, especially in Singapore’s context. This case study explored Singapore secondary art teachers’ Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) specific to Internet use, and how Internet use can enhance students’ visual literacy.

Using the Internet in teaching encompasses a broad spectrum of technologies and related pedagogical concepts. The concept of a WebQuest, a structured inquiry lesson format, was selected to scope the study. This study has three purposes: first, to see if there was a difference in students’ visual literacy learning when WebQuests were used; second, discover teaching strategies related to student achievement with and without technology; and third, derive a fuzzy generalization from the findings of how Singaporean art teachers’ might hone their Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK).

Two Secondary art teachers and four of their art classes were selected for this case study in 2012. Data collected included students’ work collected from a quasi-experiment and semi-structured teacher interviews. The data analysis followed an inductive process involving individual case analysis and cross-case analysis. The study had three key findings: first, students learned aspects of visual literacy just as well with or without WebQuest; second, teachers’ conviction, training, practice, collegial and student support contributed to their confidence of using the Internet in teaching; third, Information Communications and Technology (ICT) serviceability and accessibility, availability of time, and routines and rules specific to students’ ICT use affected art teachers’ decision and use of the Internet.

This empirical research also identified potential benefits and limitations of using WebQuests to enhance students’ visual literacy. A WebQuest allowed students to revisit the material at their own time. The effectiveness of a WebQuest to support student learning is limited by the quality of web-based materials selected as well as the design of the performance task. The study had two implications on teachers’ professional learning on TPCK and future research on the use of the Internet to enhance students’ visual literacy. First, an action learning cycle might guide teachers’ professional learning to use ICT. Second, future research on the topic could include uses of ICT to communicate, collaborate and create, rather than just using the Internet to access of information.

Presenters
LK

LIM KOK BOON

Singapore Teachers' Academy for the Arts


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 334

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 1/8: 194 Collaborative Writing Using Google Docs In A Chinese Second Language Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

Students in a natural second language class typically come from different backgrounds and their language proficiency is often highly heterogeneous. While advancements in technology with networked computers have expanded opportunities for written interaction and collaborative group work, it is observed that a teacher-fronted and product-oriented approach is still more commonly adopted. Planning and implementing group work has its different set of challenges in a computer-mediated learning environment and with most students eventually facing individual timed writing assessments during examinations, the use of collaborative writing is relatively low in comparison for Chinese second language classrooms.

Computer-mediated collaborative writing that leverages on the use of technology tools such as Google Docs provides opportunities for second language students to reap benefits in language acquisition and use. From a pedagogical perspective, proficiency is of particular interest amongst learner characteristics for teachers deciding how to best pair/ group students according to similar or different language proficiency. Factors such as patterns of interaction, tasks assigned and learners’ perception of the pair or small group learning experience also influence the effectiveness of deploying this learning mode in second language classrooms. 

This presentation allows participants to gain an understanding of how students with different proficiency interact and collaborate with their peers in Chinese second language writing using Google Docs.

Google Docs support synchronous online editing and encourage participation, engagement and collaboration for knowledge building by multiple users especially in pairs and small groups. The Google Docs automatic revision history function makes students’ learning visible. The use of a coding scheme allows further analysis of students' writing process in revision behaviours in the co-constructed texts using Chinese Hanyu Pinyin input system (i.e. a system of romanisation for phonemic notation and transcription to Roman script). 

Participant attrition contributed to the small sample size. A single collaborative writing task was examined in view of the short time frame. Future research may wish to investigate the effects of collaborative writing on individual writing.  

Understanding students’ experiences of collaborative writing is helpful as well in identifying possible challenges students may face in the process of collaboration so as to shed light on issues from the students’ perspectives and to better support pedagogical design.

The data suggested that pairing learners in high-intermediate and intermediate-low proficiency compositions might be useful in addressing some of the issues and challenges surfaced by the students in heterogeneous grouping during collaborative writing. 

Presenters
avatar for TAY HWEE FERN

TAY HWEE FERN

MOE17-CPDD


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 335

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 1/9: 169 The Teaching Of Reading Comprehension Skills Through The Use Of 10’c (十分华文) Pedagogy And Portal
Students generally face challenges in answering reading comprehension questions, especially inferential questions. They have difficulty in understanding the key points in the passage. This is further compounded by their difficulty in pronouncing and understanding the vocabulary used.

The presentation will bring together the use of the 10’C pedagogical approach, the teaching of visible thinking skills and ICT tools in the 10’C portal, to bring about the desired learning outcomes and engaged learning. Participants can learn to design lessons to help students improve their comprehension skills.

The 10’C pedagogical approach consists of 3 processes, namely delivery, reinforcement and output. In delivery, visible thinking skills are taught. Students learn to identify key points using the 4Ws (who, where, when, what) so as to understand the key content of the passage. They also learn to make inferences behind dialogues and reactions of characters in the passage. In reinforcement and output, work is assigned to students on the 10’C portal to reinforce their learning.

Students generally face challenges in answering reading comprehension questions, especially inferential questions. They have difficulty in understanding the key points in the passage. This is further compounded by their difficulty in pronouncing and understanding the vocabulary used.

The presentation will bring together the use of the 10’C pedagogical approach, the teaching of visible thinking skills and ICT tools in the 10’C portal, to bring about the desired learning outcomes and engaged learning. Participants can learn to design lessons to help students improve their comprehension skills.

The 10’C pedagogical approach consists of 3 processes, namely delivery, reinforcement and output. In delivery, visible thinking skills are taught. Students learn to identify key points using the 4Ws (who, where, when, what) so as to understand the key content of the passage. They also learn to make inferences behind dialogues and reactions of characters in the passage. In reinforcement and output, work is assigned to students on the 10’C portal to reinforce their learning.

Presenters
CP

CHEN PEIJIN

CHIJ St. Nicholas Girls School (Primary)
WP

WONG PIH FOUNG

CHIJ St. Nicholas Girls School (Primary)
YS

YONG SHEUE MEI

CHIJ St Nicholas Girls' School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 336

11:30am GMT+08

Meet the Practitioners 1: Learning Through Games to Develop Student's 21st Century Competencies in Primary CCE & Social Studies
Limited Capacity seats available

Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 332 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Model Lesson 1: 485 Engaging New Media in Values Education
Limited Capacity seats available

New media has become an integral part of the lifestyle of young people today. This poses tremendous challenges when it comes to delivery of programmes that focused on values and character education.

In The Girls’ Brigade where the inculcation of good values, character building and leadership development is integral to the development of the TOTAL GIRL, the presenters had wanted to harness new media in delivering some of these aspects of the programme.

With the support of the Ministry of Education, four online modules were developed.

The four modules are

1. Digital Explorer (cyber-wellness for members in the primary schools)

• It intends to raise awareness about the dangers of the Digital World, particularly in the area of cyber-bullying.

2. HA Quest 1 (self-awareness for Secondary 1 members)

• In the module, the girls find out about their individual personality and preferences which allows them to accept that each person is unique and enables them to appreciate differences in others.

3. HA Quest 2 (self-management for Secondary 3 members)

• The module is designed to bring the girls towards an understanding their personal responses to the four challenges presented.

4. LEAD (self-awareness in communications for Secondary 2 members)

• The module intends to build up self-awareness on how each person relates to others and how they could manage their emotions.

Each module is designed as an online QUEST. The girls work independently through each module. Their progress, responses and reflections are recorded in a data management system accessible to the officer. The information is then used by the officer for discussion during face-to-face sessions. Officers are provided with a Discussion Guide to enable them to focus on the key learning during these sessions.

In addition, the aggregated reflections from each module allow the officer an insight into the heart and mind of the girls. This allows the officer to identify common responses and expectations within the group which promotes better understanding of the girls. Further clarification and discussions deepen the learning for the girls too.

The presenters would be sharing the overview of the learning framework which guided the design of the modules. Participants would be given opportunities to view one of the game segments as well as gain insights into some of the reflections and would be able to view sample questions in the Discussion Guide.

Moderator: toh_wee_teck@moe.gov.sg  

Presenters
CY

CHONG YOKE KHEE

The Girls Brigade Singapore
CS

CHUA SWEE PENG SANDI

Senior Programme Executive, The Girls Brigade Singapore
DC

DIANA CHEE

The Girls Brigade Singapore
EC

EVANGELINE CHONG

The Girls' Brigade Singapore
GK

GOH KIM LIAN MARGARET

The Girls Brigade Singapore
LQ

LARAINE QUEK

The Girls' Brigade Singapore


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 308 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Model Lesson 2: 234 'Coolie House Design @ Chinatown' Project
Limited Capacity seats available

Situated in Singapore’s Primary 4 Social Studies curriculum, the ‘Coolie House Design@Chinatown’ project is one of Nan Chiau Primary School’s ‘FutureSchool’ projects. The project takes on a context-specific situation, role-playing game that places students in the Singapore of the 1930s, an era of the influx of Chinese immigrants.

Since the design of the project is collaborative, it has allowed students to both deepen and widen their ideas and concepts towards creating meaningful and useful knowledge. In the model lesson, presenters would share on how they have adopted the knowledge building approach to build students’ epistemic repertoire. When students are consistently challenged by knowledge building work that foregrounds the importance of human creativity, collaboration, and design, and the teachers ably facilitate students’ use of appropriate epistemic resources, it is possible for students to develop some form of coherent epistemological beliefs (Elby & Hammer, 2010). The presenters would also share the effective strategies they have used for facilitating student discourse and advancing their knowledge in a knowledge-building classroom through the ‘Coolie House Design@Chinatown’ project. They would also introduce a collaborative online platform, ‘Idea Garden’, and how it has facilitated students’ learning in a knowledge building environment.

Presenters
ER

ERWIN ROHMAN

Nan Chiau Primary



Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 309 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Spotlight 1: Teo Chew Lee
Speakers
avatar for Teo Chew Lee

Teo Chew Lee

Lead Specialist, Educational Technology Division, Ministry of Education, Singapore
Dr Teo Chew Lee started off as a Science teacher, translating knowledge building theories and technology into practice in her Science lessons more than ten years ago. That experience established her philosophy of education in which students’ ideas and questions are the most powerful... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm GMT+08
Main Hall (404AX#,405BX - 406CX) Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Spotlight 2: Greg Whitby
Speakers
avatar for Greg Whitby

Greg Whitby

Executive Director of Schools, Diocese of Parramatta
Greg Whitby has led a system of Catholic schools in the Dioceses of Parramatta and Wollongong (Australia) over the past 15 years. He is recognised as an innovative educator who is passionate about rethinking the nature of schooling in today's world and the role of learning environments... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm GMT+08
Hall 406D Suntec City Convention Hall

12:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 2/1: 483 Developing Student Leadership In Cyber Wellness Through Peer Advocacy Approach
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation focuses on the effort by Ministry of Education, Singapore (MOE) in promoting the peer advocacy approach for cyber wellness education amongst students in Singapore schools.   The presentation will highlight the case studies of two partner schools which took a proactive step to develop a culture of student leadership in cyber wellness through the peer advocacy approach.

Research (DiBasilio, 2008; Rigby, 2008) has shown that peer leaders in schools played an important role in the prevention of cyberbullying  as they helped to create awareness about bullying in the school and develop leadership skills among students.  Spears and Kofoed (2013) also found that for cyberbullying, young people not only wanted a voice but particularly wanted to be acknowledged as having expertise, and to be involved in the education of each other and their parents and teachers.

In addition, as youths are highly attuned to, and impacted by, the developments in the online space, they are in the best position to lead their peers on the importance of safe and responsible online behaviour.  To this end, MOE created a structure to promote peer advocacy for cyber wellness amongst the Singapore schools. This is done in collaboration with two partner schools where their student leaders led in the planning and implementation of the engagement programme to reach out to the schools in Singapore.  

The peer-to-peer approach of the programme, not only has created more opportunities for student participants to network and share ideas on cyber wellness, it has provided fresh perspectives and made learning about cyber wellness more authentic, relevant and impactful with the active student leaders’ voice.  This approach has also helped to provide experiential learning opportunities for the student leaders themselves to hone their leadership skill in advocating cyber wellness to their peers. 

Since its launch, the programme has received positive feedback from the participating students.   For the two partner schools, they have successfully developed a student leadership structure to promote peer advocacy within and beyond their schools and entrench a culture of active peer advocacy in cyber wellness.  Moving forward, MOE is spreading this approach to two new partner schools in 2016 to further grow student leadership in cyber wellness.

Presenters
avatar for LOH KWAI YIN

LOH KWAI YIN

HOD, Special Projects, School of Science and Technology, Singapore
In her 22 years in the education service, Kwai Yin has taught Mathematics, Computer Applications and Elements of Office Administration. In 2009, Kwai Yin joined the School of Science and Technology, Singapore (SST) as one of the pioneer staff, overseeing the ICT department and the... Read More →
TL

TAN LILY

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
WM

WONG MIN YIN

School of Science and Technology, Singapore


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 327

12:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 2/2: 518 Use Of Technology For Development Of Ideas And Coherence In Writing
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aims to share the experience of carrying out an eduLab project which involves the use of technology to support pre-writing processes to aid the development of ideas and coherence in writing during its first year of study in 2014. The eduLab project is an MOE-NIE initiative designed to surface and spread ground-up ICT-enriched pedagogical innovations. There are three primary schools involved in this eduLab project and teachers work closely with officers from the Educational Technology Division (ETD) in designing and implementing the study.

The innovation is intended to address a common weakness amongst pupils in developing links between ideas and in elaboration of ideas in writing. One key feature of this innovation is to involve pupils in acting out their story ideas in order for them to have the chance to process the ideas more deeply. This is guided by the notion of embodied cognition (Wilson, 2002) and the Situated Cognition Theory (Clancey, 1997), which relate physical interactions with the environment to the development of cognitive processes. In acting out their storyline, opportunities are created for pupils to elaborate their ideas and assess the flow of their storyline. Technology is integrated to facilitate pupils in capturing the images during the enactment stage and to subsequently allow pupils to assess the flow of images which best represents the group’s story and to add captions. During the writing stage, pupils make use of the captions as stems to allow them to develop the story, through adding details from the pre-writing discussion as well as experience from the enactment of scenes.

Led by ETD officers, a set of design principles is crafted to guide teachers in designing the learning activities, participation structures, and the social and cultural norms in the classroom (Kapur & Bielaczyc, 2012). The design principles are refined following analysis made regarding how lessons are enacted by teachers and how pupils are responding to the innovation. From the team’s analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data, there is some evidence to suggest that students have benefited from the innovation. 

Presenters
FT

FRANCIS TEO BOON HUA

Ministry of Education, Singapore
PF

PIERRE FONG

Ministry of Education
avatar for TAN LOK HUANG

TAN LOK HUANG

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
Loves coffee! Loves food! Loves ideas!


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 328

12:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 2/3: 567 The Art Of Designing For Learning With ICT To Develop Scientific Explanation For Primary Science
Limited Capacity seats available

Constructing scientific explanation is an important aspect of science learning. Research revealed that constructing explanations can enhance student understanding of the science content (Driver, Newton & Osborne, 2000).

This paper proposes a design frame from a learning designer’s perspective, to develop primary school students on constructing explanations. The design frame involves two phases namely mapping out (i) Curriculum/Content, Pedagogy and Assessments integrated with ICT, and (ii) considerations guiding the entire design process.

At Phase 1, a unit design approach is adopted to paint the big picture defining the key scientific concepts and process skills to be learned. Pedagogy and assessments are mapped out in alignment with curriculum/content goals. As the intended learning is to develop students’ scientific explanation, inquiry-based learning, more specifically, Investigative Case-Based Learning (a variant of problem-based learning) is undoubtedly an appropriate pedagogical approach based on the constructivist view of learning.

To strengthen the explanation aspect of this pedagogical approach, the Claim Evidence Reasoning (CER) explanation framework (Krajcik & McNeil, 2011), and assessment for learning strategies are integrated. ICT is seamlessly integrated in the learning process enhancing visualisation that aids understanding of concepts/processes (Trindade et al., 2002), facilitating instant feedback for students to refine experiments and hypotheses (La Velle et al., 2003), and creating student collaboration opportunities with peers (Mistler-JAt Phase 2, the thought-process is mapped out with design considerations on the learning outcomes, processes, the role of students, teachers and technologies, artefacts to be collected and analysed. These considerations in the form of metacognition questions aid an educator in their thinking when designing for learning. 

This design frame was put into practice to design a unit of science lessons in the topic of plant system. Through the enactment with two classes in a primary school, students demonstrated abilities to explore scientific questions underlying real-world issues derived from the case and to apply scientific reasoning. They worked collaboratively online to write their own claims, identify and gather evidence to support their claim. They employed a variety of methods and resources, and created digital artefacts to support their conclusions, as well as communicate and persuade others of their findings. Based on the evaluation of students’ artefacts, there were positive indications that students were able to construct scientific explanations.

Presenters
avatar for TEO CHOON BOH

TEO CHOON BOH

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 329

12:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 2/4: 069 Cultivating Interest And Good Reading Habits In Chinese Language Learners Through Read&Share @Mybookshop Project
Limited Capacity seats available

It is challenging to promote the reading of Chinese Language (CL) books among students in Singapore due to the changes in the home language environment.  The proportion of ethnic Chinese students with English as their most frequently used language at home rose from 28% in 1991 to 59% in 2010 (MOE, 2010), and this has an impact on CL learning.  A recent survey affirmed teachers’ observation that children prefer reading English Language (EL) books to CL books for leisure .   It is also challenging to implement “Undisturbed Sustained Silent Reading” (USSR) in school to promote reading of CL books due to lack of structures and processes to guide students to read effectively and motivate them to recommend books confidently.

Using the “Sustained Silent Reading through Modelling and Structure (MSSR) with ICT” approach advocated by Chien Chen, Ko & Chen (2011), the school piloted two Primary 3 classes through the Read & Share@MyBookShop Project.    

The MSSR is introduced progressively and taps on role modelling by teachers engaging in reading with students in the 15-minute silent reading to cultivate good reading habits.  Teachers facilitate the Book-Talk session where they guide students to voluntarily recommend and share an interesting story in a non-threatening face-to-face environment.  Teachers use Think-Pair-Share and Round Robin strategies to develop students' self-confidence. 

The school uses “MyBookShop” online portal for students to share and recommend books, using multimedia functions such as voice recording, drawing, rating and online writing.  Students also manage and operate their own virtual bookshop and chart their own reading progress.

The online portal allows students to access the virtual bookshop at home and encourage reading beyond school.  It's reward and recognition system motivates students to read, comment and recommend books.   Besides, students receive constructive feedback from teachers and peers to improve their book recommendation that they have posted online. Teachers also monitor their students’ reading progress and motivate them to read extensively. 

Pre and Post surveys are conducted to look into students’ attitude and motivational aspects in reading or book recommendation.  The findings of the surveys have indicated students’ positive attitude in reading and are motivated to recommend books in their virtual bookshop now.  

The limitation is in using the mouse to draw in the online book recommendation platform.  In future, a digital pen to ease students’ drawing and functions such as “editing” and “printing” in “My BookShop” online portal will be introduced.

Presenters

Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 330

12:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 2/5: 545 Online Annotation Tools To Improve Students’ Cohesion In Writing
Limited Capacity seats available

The paper presentation aims to share research findings and experiences of five schools who conducted a research project in collaboration with Technologies for Learning Branch, Educational Technology Division (ETD), Ministry of Education, Singapore. The project aims to investigate the effectiveness of using the annotation tools in the 10’M portal in improving students’ ability to write cohesively. This study complements the 2015 Malay Language Syllabus that requires students to be able to write cohesively at upper primary level.

10’M Portal is a portal developed and managed by ETD to support experimentations in the teaching and learning of the Malay Language with the use of ICT. The annotation tools available in the 10’M portal allow students to highlight and add comments or suggestions without modifying the original text itself. The tools can be thought of as a layer on top of the existing text and this annotation layer is usually visible to other users who share the same portal, therefore supporting collaborative learning amongst students. The tools allow students to identify cohesive devices used in a text, comment and suggest suitable cohesive devices, and also exchange ideas during online collaborative activities.

The study involves five schools with P4 classes.  It includes pre- and post-tests, control and experimental groups, and discourse analysis of the students’ compositions. Systemic Functional Linguistics (Halliday and Matthiessen, 2004) is the backbone of this research. The project adapts the cohesion model of Halliday and Hasan (1976), and Sanat (2002) to suit the needs of P4 Malay Language (ML) students. The cohesive devices that this research focuses on are ‘additive’, ‘adversative’, ‘causal’ and ‘temporal’. Teachers conduct a one hour lesson twice weekly for a period of 5 consecutive weeks from Term 3 Week 2 until Term 3 Week 6. However, unlike the control group, the experimental groups leverage the annotation tools functions available in the 10’M Portal. Besides conducting discourse analysis of the cohesive devices in the students’ compositions (pre-test, post-test), feedback from teachers and students are collected for triangulation.

Presenters
MB

MULIANA BINTE MOHAMMAD

MOE/Jiemin Primary School
NB

NORHANA BINTE KHAMIS

Ministry of Education
NB

NURHIDAYAH BINTE MOHD SALLEH

Ministry of Education
RB

RIDZWAN BIN JAMIL

Ministry of Education
SS

SITI SALMAH BINTE HAMID

Ministry of Education
SS

SITI SURAIDAH RAHIM

Ministry of Education
SB

SURYANI BTE ATAN

Senior Specialist, EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
ZM

ZUBAIDAH MAHAMOOD

Pioneer Primary


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 333 Suntec City Convention Hall

12:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 2/6: 187 Enhancing Students’ Learning Of Science Through Analytics
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this paper is to share our efforts to leverage on learning analytics to enhance students’ learning of Science.  From the perspective of faculty members, learning analytics can help identify at-risk learners and provide interventions, transform pedagogical approaches, and help students gain insight into their own learning (Long and Siemens, 2011).  However, Wright et al (2014) noted that it was a challenge to utilize large data analysis for actionable and effective interventions in the classroom.  This sharing attempts to identify strategies for educators to leverage learning analytics to guide them in monitoring their students’ progress and plan suitable intervention strategies.  It is hoped that the provision of real-time information of each student’s progress to teachers would lead to greater and more personalised support for every learner in our schools.

Recognising the influence that learning analytics can have on teaching and learning, MOE-ITB and NCS collaboratively embarked on a study to make available learning analytics systems to schools in an attempt to identify teaching practices that enhance students’ learning through the use of analytics.  As part of our study, 15 schools have been provided with training and access to Toktol (a Science-based learning system with built-in learning analytics tool).  Teachers integrated the use of Toktol into their teaching and made use of the data generated on students’ learning to guide their lesson planning and delivery.

With the first phase of the study completed in Nov 2015, it is hoped that analysis of the data gathered from the study will shed some light on the benefits of analytics systems, especially in helping teachers visualise their students’ learning and facilitating lesson planning.  At the same time, it is also hoped that the data gathered will provide useful information on the design of future learning analytics systems, and identify critical datasets that are able to provide teachers with data on students’ learning.

Presenters
BS

BERNARD SIT

Senior Applications Consultant, Ministry of Education, Information Technology Branch


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 334

12:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 2/7: 030 EngiNEARing Instructional Design To Cater To Different Learning Styles
Limited Capacity seats available

At the School of the Arts (SOTA), teachers recognise that every student is uniquely and artistically talented. A challenge in such an environment is in responding to each student’s unique learning style and needs. The school has adopted Differentiated Instruction (DI) to help students tackle the rigorous curriculum and encourages the use of ICT to design learning experiences that would engage students for deep learning. In this presentation, participants will appreciate how teachers can facilitate DI through the use of ICT tools such as Nearpod. Such tools can be used to limit distraction and multitasking during a lesson by broadcasting content and interactive learning activities/exercises to individual student devices in real-time.

This approach also allows teachers to provide real-time support and encouragement to boast engagement in individual and group learning.  Besides instructional approaches, presenters will also share how DI through technology provides the platform for interactivity such as embedding multiple choice questions, polls, videos, quizzes, open-ended questions and web-links in their presentations. By providing students the flexibility in the way they respond through sketching, scribbling or typing, etc. This approach provided a great way to assess students’ readiness by checking what they already know, make connections and even identify misconceptions and students responded positively as they felt that lessons were more engaging and individualized as they had greater autonomy as a personal voice in the way they responded to their teachers.

Presenters
JF

JAMES FOO

School of The Arts, Singapore
NB

NG BEE SUN

Participant, School of the Arts, Singapore


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 335

12:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 2/8: 218 Implementing Differentiated Instruction Using NearPod
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Differentiated instruction (DI) has been gaining attention in recent years as educators realize its potential in classroom teaching and learning. As educators recognise that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to teaching, there is a need to understand that pupils enter the classroom with varying degree of differences in their readiness levels, interests and learning profiles. Therefore, pupils will learn more effectively and efficiently when teachers differentiate their instructions in class according to the content being taught, process of learning or pupil’s product according to each pupil’s needs. In order to better facilitate DI, ICT could be integrated into such lessons to further enhance pupils’ learning.

As uses of tablets (for example, iPads) become increasingly widespread, it would be beneficial for educators to tap into its potential affordances for teaching. Tablets are interactive and their capability to run various multimedia functions could better engage pupils during the learning process. They are also mobile, which allows for traditional classroom lessons to be carried out outdoors or on-the-go. Their ability to stay connected to the internet through cellular data also allows teachers to monitor and assess pupils in real-time. As pupils are familiar with tablets and their functions, this will enable lessons to be conducted smoothly. Lastly, the large repertoire of applications that is readily available could also be taken advantage of. This session aims to create an Upper Primary English lesson by harnessing the affordances of a tablet in developing a seamless DI lesson. We will be utilizing the following application – Nearpod for the demonstration. Within the application, pupils are able to draw images, take photographs and answer questions in various formats. Their responses would then be submitted to the teacher who is able to check and assess their progress simultaneously. The teacher is also able to dispatch each of the responses to all pupils through the application for discussion.

As the session aims to explore the possibility of creating differentiated activities within an ICT platform, participants are encouraged to suggest and experiment with possible modifications to the activities. It also aims to look into how pupils will get to experience both self-directed and collaborative learning through the various differentiated activities.  Lastly, the session will end by discussing the benefits and sustainability of conducting a DI lesson using Nearpod or other related applications on a tablet.

Presenters
avatar for LEOW QINJIN

LEOW QINJIN

Blangah Rise Primary


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 336

12:00pm GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Marshall Cavendish Education
Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

12:30pm GMT+08

Up Close 1: Greg Whitby
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Greg Whitby

Greg Whitby

Executive Director of Schools, Diocese of Parramatta
Greg Whitby has led a system of Catholic schools in the Dioceses of Parramatta and Wollongong (Australia) over the past 15 years. He is recognised as an innovative educator who is passionate about rethinking the nature of schooling in today's world and the role of learning environments... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:30pm - 1:00pm GMT+08
MR 310 Suntec City Convention Hall

12:30pm GMT+08

Lunch Break
Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:30pm - 2:00pm GMT+08
Hall 401 & Hall 402

1:00pm GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: LogicMills Learning Cenre Pte Ltd
Wednesday March 30, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

2:00pm GMT+08

Keynote 2: Mizuko Ito
Speakers
avatar for Mizuko Ito

Mizuko Ito

DML Research Director, UCHRI
Professor Mizuko Ito is a cultural anthropologist of technology use, examining children and youth’s changing relationships to media and communications and is Professor in Residence and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning at the University... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm GMT+08
Main Hall (404AX#,405BX - 406CX) Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

Afternoon Tea Break
Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 136 Digital Journaling in Design and Technology
When generating ideas to solve design problems, Design & Technology (D&T) students working on their own may not fully benefit at the problem identification and ideation stages in the design process . At times, their ideas are limited in variety and lacking in exploration to adequately propose suitable ideas that meet the user’s needs and the design specifications.



This presentation aims to share the experience of carrying out an eduLab project between the project teachers from three Singapore secondary schools and the officers from Educational Technology Division, Ministry of Education.



The innovation draws on studies in Knowledge Building (KB) to guide their students to generate ideas, build-on, and improve their ideas (So et al., 2010; Zhang, Hong, Scardamalia, Teo, & Morley, 2011.) In addition, the works by Hong, Zhang, Teo, & Scardamalia (2009) and Zhang et al. (2011) inform the teachers on the significance of using scaffolds in designing lessons that guide students to generate ideas in their D&T lessons and to collaboratively comment on each other’s ideas to improve their initial ideas with a digital tool, and to support the adoption of KB. Specifically, the innovative lesson design framework facilitates teachers’ efforts to design learning activities, student participation structures, and the social and cultural norms in the classroom that use technology to support students working with ideas (Kapur & Bielaczyc, 2012).



The practice gives students opportunities to be exposed to other perspectives and thus encouraged to be more exploratory in the ideation stage. Students have demonstrated that meaningful comments help them to address their learning gaps.




Presenters
AC

ANDREW CHAN CHUN YAN

Fuchun Secondary School
TY

TANG YULING

Marsiling Secondary School
YC

YAP CHEE PING ANTHONY

YISHUN TOWN SECONDARY SCHOOL



Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 246 Predicting Performance using Smart Data from E-Learning for Timely Intervention
Teachers have the task of ploughing through data of the class(es) they teach in efforts to create for their pupils a “personalised education program designed to maximise education outcomes.”

“They (teachers) have always been data workers – assessing students’ understanding of the material based on test scores, classroom engagement, quality of homework, etc., with the goal of improving that understanding” (Olavsrud, T).

In Wellington, aside from monitoring pupils’ daily assignments and their class participation rates, teachers often race against time at the end of an exam in each term collating data for Item Analysis purposes for each subject in order to identify questions that pupils have performed weakly on so as to remediate after the exam. The problem with this is that data gathered from such analysis provides information only after the exam. Remediation helps the pupils only in the next exam.

What is needed is a faster and more effective means of identifying weak topics so that intervention can be done earlier to help pupils’ scores prior to the exams in each term. Online resources have largely been an under-utilised method of data gathering for this purpose. According to Putnam & Borko, “…multimedia systems, with their new and flexible ways of representing and connecting information, can enable teachers to explore unfamiliar pedagogical practices and various problems of pedagogy.”

Hence, we did a study with the purpose to find a platform that enables teachers to identify topics that their pupils are weak in so that they can conduct intervention and remediation to improve their pupils’ understanding of these topics before their exam.

As such, the intervention meted by team were using online competitions and personalised e-learning activities to encourage pupils to do more Mathematics practices and measuring monthly participation and proficiency report to monitor the performance of each class and identify pupils’ weak topics.

We thus, Welington uses e-learning (Koobits) results to predict the performance can be used effectively and is a new opportunity for teachers to discover problems earlier and intervene to help students.

To illustrate, in the case of class 4D, the snapshot of e-learning results at the end of March 2015 showed a 90% correlation to the upcoming performance of pupils for SA1 in the next month. Combined with the matrices that will be shared with participants, the prediction accuracy was up to 95%. Do come and join in the presentation to be more enlightened.


Presenters
KJ

KAREN JUDE KOEK

Wellington Primary School
ML

MADELEINE LIM

Wellington Primary School
MI

MOHAMAD IDRIS ASMURI

Wellington Primary School
avatar for Mr. Roslee bin Jalie

Mr. Roslee bin Jalie

HOD ICT, WELLINGTON PRIMARY SCHOOL
Roslee Bin Jalie is the HOD ICT of Wellington Primary School and has been teaching for twenty years. His work in the area of Flipped Classroom started in early 2012 but he has gone on to share on various local and international platform. He uses a variety of tools along such as the... Read More →
SR

SITI ROHAIYAH MOHAMED

Wellington Primary



Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 516 Using ICT and 'DOUHAO' Newspaper to Learn the Skill of Giving Opinions
This ICT lesson is about how to use the articles in "DOUHAO" newspaper to conduct CL lessons. To help students be more aware of current issues, it is important that we can find effective way to use this newspaper. This lesson consists of 2 sessions (70 mins). The objectives are to equip students with the skills of giving opinions using ICT in the self-directed and collaborative way. Session one: study comments in newspaper. Each student in the same group has a different comment on the same topic. As a group, they find out 2 new words they have learnt through the passages and submit through "Answer Garden". This ICT tool allows the words which most students choose became more obvious. Students will in the end learn some popular new words together. Next, students will study the comments and paraphrase it through "Padlet". This ICT tool allows students to see other groups' sharing, and learn from each other. Session two: Students learn how to give opinions with the guide of a given checklist. The checklist on how to give good opinions is in a google form with a box below for students to fill up their opinions. In the end, students may self-assess their groups' opinions by ticking the items in the checklist. Teacher will share each group's opinion for students to vote for a best opinion. The lesson feedback from students is positive. Students prefer to learn using ICT and they believe they are able to master the teaching and learning objectives more effectively.

Presenters
ZH

ZHAO HAI PING

Ahmad Ibrahim Secondary



Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 562 Digital Media Creators of the Future - Fun with Coding
In 2014, Cedar Primary School became one of the pilot schools to step foot into the uncharted territory of computer programming for primary school pupils which was then known as “Fun with Coding”.



“Fun with Coding” essentially exposes pupils to the world of basic computer coding through the use of Scratch, a visual programming authoring tool. The vibrant interface of Scratch coupled with friendly drag-and-drop controls provides an enriching and inviting introduction for young children into the potentially daunting world of computer programming.



Through a weekly 60-minute session that runs for a total of 8 weeks, the primary 4 and 5 pupils learnt important strategies used for solving problems and formulating solutions in the domain of computational thinking.



Pupils need to use their analytical thinking together with their arsenal of tools ranging from simple animation to the complex use of conditional statements that eventually led them to design a solution to tackle the problems – such as making a perfectly running game much tougher or designing an app that makes everyday choices for the users etc. With the teacher acting as a facilitator, the pupils are highly encouraged to be independent learners and to persevere in the debugging process while trying different ways to approaching problems.



The lesson design also takes into consideration the uniqueness of each individual and their different learning pace. When pupils complete their tasks, they would be given additional tougher challenges where more variables are involved and less guidance is provided. With this differentiated approach, most, if not all, pupils can enjoy a rewarding coding experience and are also spurred on by their peers’ achievements.



With the knowledge acquired for coding, pupils also advocate cyber wellness values via the creation of the games using the codes. An example would be creating a short story with character dialogues that teach the pupils on how to behave properly on the Internet.



One of the greatest challenges in the implementation of the programme is to find the time and space to fit it inside the already packed curriculum. The school has effectively used the total curriculum to develop pupils in the learning of coding.



With the teachers as the facilitators and ICT executive as the trainer, the ICT Department has mapped out the development plans of the pupils from P4-P6, aiming to develop pupils to become competent digital media creators of the future.



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Presenters
FY

FOO YONG CHIN IVAN

Cedar Primary School
NT

NICHOLAS TAN

Cedar Primary School
SL

SANDY LIM

Cedar Primary School



Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 578 Smarter School: Using ICT to Improve Work Processes
This project has been awarded the MOE Innergy Commendation Award in 2015, the 2014 MIB Thematic Challenge "Improving Work Process" and SPA In-House IQC Assessment 2015.



There is a rising global trend of using Data analytics in many industries to enable organisations in making better business decisions. Yet, the use of such an approach in schools has generally been lacking. Schools typically have broad masses of data, ranging from students’ academic grades/progress, attendance, character-development indicators to data pertaining to teachers’ training, appraisal, satisfaction etc. But there is no concerted and standardised approach in the collection, archiving and analysis of this information to enhance operational workflow and processes in schools.



With the pervasiveness of technology in Singapore schools and a growing desire for more open data and information from stakeholders, e.g. students, teachers, parents, teacher-leaders and school leaders, there are a lot of opportunities for better data gathering and analysis in schools. Starting with People, the stakeholders (e.g. What will benefit teachers and their students?) and what they Value, school workflow/processes are re-designed, empowered by Systems and Technology that will Impact value-change in them and provide Analytics to inform them as well. We keenly believe in a people-centric process whereby people and what they value is critical. Their values will drive behaviour that reinforces a school culture where these shared values are practised coherently and consistently. Data input and collation is achieved by commonly available online tools, i.e. Google Sheets and Forms. Google Apps Scripts is used to enable data-flow and work process automation. Data from the stakeholders are consolidated and shared with other stakeholders regularly and in a timely manner. The data are further analysed, and serve to inform and drive appropriate behaviour from stakeholders. An example is a reflective teacher practitioner (value) who initiates quality personal reflection (behaviour 1) and builds collaborative knowledge (behaviour 2) via an Integrated Academic Curriculum Analytic and Review system, which in turn promote a sustainable school-wide environment encouraging innovation and professional development (Culture). Similarly, an engaged parent (value) will provide timely and strong support (behaviour 1) to monitor their children in partnership with the school (behaviour 2) via an Academic Calendar system, reinforcing a conscientious learning culture. Some other key processes also include student leadership development and staff training. Through this approach, the school is able to leverage on ICT to simplify its work processes and reinforce desired values and culture in its stakeholders.

Presenters
JW

JOHN WU

Anglo-Chinese School (Barker Road)
TH

TOH HUN KHIM

Anglo-Chinese School (Barker)



Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 581 Creating Conditions, Building Culture: Leveraging Technology and Date to Transform Character and Cognitive Holistic Assessment and Management for Developing Future Ready Student
In Catholic High School, we believe in a student-centred holistic education to groom our students to be future-ready and caring citizens. The school has developed processes with a system, the Character and Cognitive Holistic Assessment and Management Programme for Students (C2HAMPS), to leverage data mining and data-driven decision making for designing regular, timely and effective improvements and enhancement to our CCE teaching and learning, so as to ensure a student-centric and personalised programme that addresses the socio-emotional needs of our students.



C2HAMPS is a set of human processes, infrastructure and use-anywhere mobile app and desktop software system to collect, analyse and utilise student development data on just-in-time and also scheduled basis. In CHS, CCE lessons are customised for the levels and classes based on the student profiles reported in C2HAMPS, and student well-being survey data collected on a semestral basis. Based on the data collected, the CCE team customises the CCE curriculum, including class/level lessons and breakfast sessions (personalised mentorship) to groom our students into our vision outcomes of leaders, gentlemen and bilingual scholars.



The data collected is used at several platforms. School leaders and the Middle Managers use the data to monitor the overall holistic development of each level, and adjust the programme according to level needs. For example, based on the feedback on students’ behavioural attributes given by the form teachers via C2HAMPS, CCE team maps out the schedule and curriculum for the following year. Teachers also use the data to review the development of each student and to provide effective guidance when necessary during platforms such as our weekly Morning Breakfast Session with students. Through these conditions of pervasive processes and provision of infrastructure, the school builds a caring culture that exemplifies the school value of doing everything with love.



Participants would be able to

(i) Understand the processes of C2HAMPS

(ii) See tangible examples, including C2HAMPS reports, of how the school uses C2HAMPS to monitor student development by level (Middle Managers)

(iii) How teachers make use of C2HAMPS to show care and concern

(iv) Understand how Catholic High School build our culture of love




Presenters
CC

CAROL CHONG XING LE

Catholic High School (Secondary)
TE

TAN EE SIN

Catholic High School



Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Koobits Pte Ltd
Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 3/1: 397 How Much Can We Learn? Utilising Cognitive Load Theory In Instructional Design
Limited Capacity seats available

Given the limited capacity of our working memory, how do we cope with the wide array of sensory information around us? In order not to be overwhelmed by our surrounding, we necessarily filter and select sensory information for processing. What implication does this have for educators who are routinely creating rich learning tasks for their students, and increasingly in a multi-sensory online environment? In this paper, I suggest drawing on research in Cognitive Load Theory as we consider our learning design and design parameters. This paper also discusses how we can design meaningful and appropriate learning experiences that leverage the affordances of technology, without overwhelming our students.

Research in Cognitive Load Theory began in the 1980s and has since undergone further development and expansion (Paas, Renkl & Sweller, 2003).  The theory offers an important dimension to designers of learning experiences in that it considers “the structure of information and cognitive architecture that allows learners to process that information” (ibid: p.1).   Due to the limited processing capacity of the mind, the learning process can be hampered when the learner is overwhelmed by the additive effects of intrinsic, germane and extraneous cognitive loads. Paas, Renkl and Sweller (2003) discuss how intrinsic and extraneous loads can be reduced to free up more capacity for schema acquisition and automation through better instructional control. In addition, van Merriënboer, Kirschner and Kester (2003) suggest methods of scaffolding and methods of just-in-time information presentation as ways to manage the high cognitive load of authentic, whole tasks. Both articles offer useful implications for educators in that they argue for more thoughtful instructional planning that take into the structure of information and the task complexity. Their premises form the basis for this paper and this paper will offer some thoughts and suggestions for how cognitive loads can be managed, particularly in online learning environments.

Presenters
FL

FLORENCE LEE CHING TING

Anglo-Chinese School (Barker Road)


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 327

3:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 3/2: 557 21st Century Competencies – Design for IT to make IT happen!
Limited Capacity seats available

Building 21st century competencies (21CC) in our students is crucial to prepare them for a future which requires them not only to be masters in their own fields but to be navigators in an uncertain economy. While MOE has provided clear standards and benchmarks for schools through the 21CC Framework and lesson exemplars, teachers may not possess the metalanguage when it comes to 21CC and what needs to go into the explicit design of 21CC lessons.

Crescent Girls’ School (CGS) embarked on a journey to design for 21CC explicitly in our curriculum in 2012, when we collaborated with Stanford Research Institute, SRI (International), to develop all teachers in the use of a learning design framework called 21st Century Learning Design (21CLD). This framework has been used in a longitudinal research project with several countries and one of the key findings is that innovative teaching practices take place only if they have been explicitly designed for. 21CLD provides step-by-step rubrics for design of lessons which develop 21CC like Collaboration, Knowledge Construction, Skilled Communication, Real-World Problem Solving and Global Awareness, which are mapped to the MOE 21CC Framework. As part of continual professional learning on the use of technology for teaching and learning for all staff, the school has developed a cloud-based portal that empowers teachers to co-create 21CLD lessons.

This 21CLD portal foregrounds the 21CLD rubrics in the context of lesson design, thereby enabling teachers to deliberately incorporate lesson features that develop specific 21CC. With collaborative features built in, it has already been used in the co-creation of 21CC learning experiences within the S2 cluster, and in national platforms like the Digital Age Learning Conference held at Crescent Girls’ School. This portal offers the potential of facilitating ground-up collaboration and strengthening a collegial culture of continual ICT-enabled learning among teachers through the establishment of Networked Learning Communities.

 

This workshop takes participants through the 21CLD framework and unpacks one of the dimensions - collaboration. Participants can also expect to experience the co-creation of a 21CLD lesson with likeminded 21st century educators, with the goal of igniting a 21CLD Networked Learning Community, beyond CGS, the cluster, with or without the use of the 21CLD Portal.

Presenters
JT

JOSEPH THAM

Crescent Girls' School
RK

RICHARD KOH PEE CHOU

richard_koh@crescent.edu.sg, Crescent Girls' School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 328

3:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 3/3: 316 Little Environment Journalists – Use Of Blended ICT-Tools To Enhance Confidence And Mastery In The Use Of Mother Tongue Languages
Limited Capacity seats available

The proposed paper is a report on how Sembawang Primary School uses blended ICT-tools to foster confidence and mastery in Mother Tongue Languages (MTL) amongst Primary 2 pupils. 

The MTL teachers believe that aural and oral communication is a critical component in language skills, and children learn best through authentic and meaningful application of those skills. As such, an interdisciplinary strategy, combining language assignments, project work, and environmental studies, has been adopted.  

In this project, primary 2 pupils played the role of junior journalists and their task was to develop a radio news report on an environmental issue. Working in groups of 4 or 5, they had to decide on an environmental issue of interest, such as littering, presence of stray animals or recycling, and interview different segments of the public to gather their views on that issue, before putting together a 5-minute news report promoting the appropriate environmental message relating to their chosen issue. Pupils who demonstrated the capability to do more than their peers were guided to expand their product into a television news report.  

Pupils made use of the voice recording features in iPods and iPads to record their interview. They also made use of various translation, writing and voice / video editing apps to organise their thoughts and prepare their presentation. As this project spanned over a period of 2 months, and pupils had to discuss their project outside curriculum time, they were also taught to make use of online discussion tools on the school’s Learning Management System (LMS) and freeware like TodaysMeet. 

This task has enabled pupils to acquire and practice questioning and answering techniques, as well as provided them with an authentic opportunity to converse in their MTL on issues which are meaningful to them. During the course of completing the task, pupils demonstrated an enthusiasm for learning MTL. They not only looked forward to showcasing their own productions, but were also keen to listen and/or view their friends’ news reports. In addition, pupils also had the chance to develop social-emotional competencies and ICT-savviness. 

To ensure the continued success of this strategy, we recognise the need to have a structured process to establish common baseline knowledge of ICT tools amongst pupils. Teachers too, must continuously keep abreast of new ICT tools, apps and software that can better support pupils’ discussion and engagement.

Presenters
TZ

TAN ZUO HOU

Sembawang Primary School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 329

3:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 3/4: 054 Learning In The Digital Age - A Swedish Perspective
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

This paper will take a starting point in the fact that the global landscapes of communication, learning, collaboration and labour markets are dynamic. Botkyrka Municipality in Sweden has during the last four years worked strategically and methodically to meet the challenges and opportunities afforded. In this paper we intend to reflect over our strategies, lessons learned and challenges ahead from three perspectives, political, educational and leadership.

Botkyrka Municipality has 90 000 inhabitants and manages 25 schools and 50 preschools. Today every school and preschool has access to Internet and each student in our secondary and gymnasia schools borrow a digital device under the duration of their studies. In our primary schools we have a guaranteed access of one digital device per three children and in preschools access of one digital device per ten children. Our ambition is that by 2018 all of our school children will have their own digital device sponsored by the municipality. Our schools can choose which digital device they deem best supports our pedagogical goals. We work extensively on a broad base with professional development and evaluation and follow up. The overall goal is that ICT is used as a means to promote children and students' educational development. Expectations are to develop new and improved environments for learning, and thereby better equip our students to interact in a global and digital context. 

Some of our key questions we ask are:

  • How and where does learning happen?

  • How can we support learning?

  • How can we empower our educators and management to support learning?

  • How can we work with strategically with change management?

  • How can we support the process of change?

  • What kind of leadership facilitates change?

Lessons learned are that our youth need to be guided even in the digital world. The second digital divide is apparent. Our students clearly feel empowered in their learning and the potential in collaborative learning and symbiosis between non-formal and informal learning is enormous. Leadership at all levels and professional sharing are key factors in change.  

A number of processes have been initiated and the challenges ahead can be defined as threefold.How do we raise the standard in all of our schools? How can we empower our management and schools to facilitate and encourage change? How can we empower and facilitate our students to take a more active role in their learning processes?

Moderators
avatar for ELAINE JEE

ELAINE JEE

Senior Educational Technology Officer, Ministry of Education
Elaine conducts classroom research on implementation principles for sustainable and scalable applications of ICT for enriched learning experiences. She has shared her findings at various international conferences. Elaine also promotes a culture of active experimentation and reflective... Read More →

Presenters
SE

SUSANNE ENGLUND

Botkyrka municipality, Sweden
avatar for TONY MCCACARRICK

TONY MCCACARRICK

IT strategist, Municipality of Botkyrka Sweden


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 330

3:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 3/5: 373 Teaching PE: Anytime, Anywhere – Extending Learning Space With Technology
Limited Capacity seats available

The paper focuses on extending academic learning time – physical education (ALT-PE) (Siedentop, Tousignant and Parker, 1982) beyond classroom for students, where technology becomes the lynch-pin in facilitating students’ learning anytime, anywhere.

The team will share how they had applied the flipped classroom pedagogy in PE, and how assessment for learning can be employed within the flipped classroom framework, enabled by technology to augment the learning process. Assessment for learning is infused throughout the module by interspersing the learning unit with dipstick testing, coupled with peer critique and feedback.

This model of extending ALT-PE can be applied to practically any PE modules that aim to beef up on student practice time, in particular sports where students will not typically play on their own.

In the theory of social constructivism, it is theorized that construction of knowledge is heavily influenced by the social context in which the student is immersed. (Victor Chen, 2010) Using the power of social media, this project has its effect amplified through how students of the digital age interact socially online. Namely, some would spend hours ensuring near-perfect performance of video task before posting to upkeep their virtual self-image. Hence an increase in how students spend time to play sports is observed. 

Using technology to facilitate deeper self-directed learning (SDL) is also in keeping with the TPACK framework (Archambault & Crippen, 2009), where the teacher identifies appropriate content and pedagogy that can be enhanced by technology to deepen knowledge and understanding.

The team has designed modules on football and volleyball. These sports, when boosted by technology, have encouraged the students to go beyond regular lesson time to learn specific skills. A summary of key benefits of this project:

1.Improvement in skills and techniques

A summative assessment at the end of the module shows marked improvement in a fixed set of skills tested.

2.Reported hours of practice

Students reported on hours of practice before uploading videos of performance. In wanting to achieve a perfect form or performance, students voluntarily puts in effective hours on perfecting skills.

3.Increase in enjoyment and enthusiasm of the sport

Students indicated a high level of enjoyment of the sport through a pre and post-module survey. Enjoyment is also evident in student participation in class, their promptness in submission of assignments and their willingness to engage one another in deeper conversation on skill/performance critique.

Presenters
FE

FRANCES ESS

Mayflower Secondary
avatar for Jason Zhuo

Jason Zhuo

Teacher, MFSS
MC

MATTHEW CHAN

Mayflower Secondary School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 333 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 3/6: 286 Effectiveness Of E-Learning With Online Forum Vs E-Learning With Face-To-Face Lesson
Limited Capacity seats available

e-Learning is practised widely in Singapore schools. However, is computer-mediated interaction as good as face-to-face interaction? This study compares the effectiveness of two forms of e-learning; an e-learning package with a teacher-led online forum was compared with an e-learning package with a face-to-face follow-up lesson.

Two classes of Secondary Three (Express) GCE O Level Science (Physics) students in a mainstream government school accessed an online independent learning package on Thermal Properties without teacher input, after which an online pre-test was administered. Class A later went on to participate in a 40-minute teacher-led online forum while Class B had a one-hour lesson in class with their subject teacher. Both classes subsequently took their post-test. A survey was subsequently administered to Class A to obtain their perspective of their learning in the online forum. Statistical analysis of the pre- and post-test data revealed that Class A scored significantly better than Class B, showing that computer-mediated interaction via an online forum produced better test scores than face-to-face learning.

The survey results suggest that the improvement to student learning was perceived to be due to the novelty of the learning mode, better participation rate in an online setting and the chapter being suitable for e-learning. This study suggests that schools can conduct e-learning for suitable topics without any follow-up face-to-face lessons, saving precious curriculum time.

Presenters
avatar for PHOA YEW HUI

PHOA YEW HUI

Physics Teacher, Damai Secondary School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 334

3:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 3/7: 292 The Extent To Which ICT Can Facilitate AfL
Limited Capacity seats available

Students’ misconceptions were seldom addressed in a prompt and constructive manner, particularly at the start of learning each Mathematics topic. Teachers only had time/resources to ask a few students to present their answers on the board for feedback. Many students became less attentive either because the feedback was not about their answers, or that they merely wait to copy the correct answer. Learning was not multiplied. This left the majority of students with many misconceptions, which led to confusion, poor grades and eventually a decrease in interest, rendering further attempts to motivate the student largely ineffective. Although teachers knew that giving feedback on every student’s work simultaneously as part of the classroom teaching experience will be most beneficial for learning, this was difficult in a class of 40 students.

Therefore, the project investigates the extent to which ICT-facilitated pedagogical approaches increases Effective Feedback (immediate, clear and affirmative) in Assessment for Learning through multimodality (oral, written & drawing) in a typical class of about 40 students as compared to one without ICT facilitation.

The project used Nearpod, software that facilitates interaction real-time, to project all students’ responses on the classroom screen in real-time and ensure maximum participation rate by means of peer-pressure as well as teacher monitoring. Nearpod also allows screenshot-archiving of students’ responses for sharing with other teachers to emphasise common misconceptions.  This software was run on Microsoft Windows Surface Pro 2, a portable operating system which could be conveniently kept in classrooms, thus not requiring the use of computer labs, and so saving time on moving students to and fro. Surface Pro also allowed students to write mathematical equations and teachers to give written feedback.

Immediate correction and praise, both verbal and written, raises subject interest when they can compare their answers with their peers immediately.

Future project plans can focus on overcoming current challenges faced which include the limited writing space provided by Nearpod, integration of other pedagogical approaches such as Assessment as Learning and classroom management (restless students who complete their task early).

Presenters
CP

CHITRA PANNEER SELVAM

Compassvale Secondary School, MOE
KW

Kuan Wai Kit

Education Officer, Compassvale Secondary School
LD

LEOW DENG LI

COMPASSVALE SECONDARY SCHOOL
NE

NUR ELLYNA MOHD ISA

Compassvale Secondary School, MOE
TW

TAN WEI KIANG DEREK

Education Officer, Compassvale Secondary School
TH

TANG HUI BOON

Compassvale Secondary School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 335

3:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 3/8: 440 Engaged and Meaningful Learning through Collaboration supported by ICT
Limited Capacity seats available

Students generally view collaborative learning (CoL) as something that is manageable and productive when it is carried out in the form of face-to-face interaction rather than in a virtual environment. Studies show that students show 'moderate enthusiasm for working in groups and the participants disclose both positive and negative experiences of this of working' (Cantwell & Andrews, 2002). 

The main focus of this paper is to address students' point of view of the use of ICT for CoL and to understand why they feel this way. One of the reasons for this perspective is because of the way a learning task is designed – when no opportunities are given to students to work through activities that involve ongoing efforts in meaning negotiation and the establishment of shared understanding among them. The discourse that is critical for CoL is often short-changed in the classroom (face-to-face) because of time-tabled time allocated for lesson delivery.  Besides these students also generally see each lesson/session as a complete unit rather than an extension of learning that goes beyond the lesson proper. 

Another reason for students’ skewed view of ICT supported CoL is because of the way the affordances of ICT is harnessed. Technology selected should support pedagogy, delivery of content and development of knowledge at the same time. 

The lack of awareness of the curriculum designers of what is required to encourage 'practices of meaning-making in the context of a joint activity' and 'the ways in which these practices are mediated through designed artefacts' harnessing the affordance of technology (Koschmann, 2002) will promote active learning online, and in the process will promote the use of ICT for collaborative learning and also make learning useful.  

The use of Google Spreadsheet, Google Docs, Google Slides and Wix were introduced to promote active collaboration beyond the classroom over period of more than 14 weeks of project work in the Sec 1 classroom. This helped to promote joint activities within each group that required students to collect data, share and analyse followed by a research on the health indicator they selected as a group.  Students completed an oral presentation, a report and a digital poster collaboratively.  

Teachers as facilitators provided the guidance, scaffolds and challenged the students to stretch their potential. On the other hand students were able to learn at their own pace, challenge themselves to do their best and were self-motivated to complete their work on time.

Presenters
AC

ANDREW CHAN WU SIONG

Northland Secondary School
LC

LIAO CAI ZHUANG

Northland Secondary School
MM

MOOKAIAH MANONMANI

HOD ICT/MRL, Northland Secondary School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 336

3:30pm GMT+08

[CANCELLED] Up Close 2: Mizuko Ito
This session has been cancelled.

Speakers
avatar for Mizuko Ito

Mizuko Ito

DML Research Director, UCHRI
Professor Mizuko Ito is a cultural anthropologist of technology use, examining children and youth’s changing relationships to media and communications and is Professor in Residence and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning at the University... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 310 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

Meet the Practitioners 2: Learning Chemistry Through Games
Limited Capacity seats available

Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm GMT+08
MR 332 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

Model Lesson 3: 341 Herstory of Nanyang Girls' High School - The Uses and Users of iBooks
Limited Capacity seats available

Curriculum time is precious to all teachers; being able to complete the syllabus as well as elicit deep thinking in students is always an ideal objective. This model lesson will demonstrate how iBooks can be utilized in an academic unit to facilitate independent learning and to create more time to develop higher order thinking in class.

Nanyang Girls’ High School has been on one-to-one computing since 2011. Like many other institutions, Nanyang Girls’ High School has been applying the principles of flip teaching in the curriculum. Beyond assigning readings as homework, the Herstory ibook taps on the platform offered by Apple to enhance students’ learning, self-assessment and project management.

Herstory is part of the Secondary 3 Language Arts curriculum. It requires students to recall the characteristics of different text types and forms, comprehend how these linguistic features affect communication, and apply this knowledge in a group project, in order to create a story that gives voice to the challenges faced by women.

In the past, this unit relied largely on teacher-centred approaches, especially when it came to explaining the task requirements and the possible approaches, which often took 1 or 2 curriculum periods. With flip teaching made possible through the iBook, such dissemination of information and revision could be done outside of class, allowing teachers to improve the analysis and evaluation process of learning.

The iBook is used in several ways: Firstly, beyond a substitution of the textbook, the iBook allows teachers to incorporate assessment for learning. Secondly, it is designed as a one-stop manual to guide students in their collaborative project. Thirdly, it provides a platform to increase student engagement by using multimedia.

The new challenge for teachers is then how they can facilitate the in-class feedback such that it elicits higher-order thinking and how to maintain focus and engagement in class.

The team believe that knowledge should be shared. Hence, our iBook was made available on the public domain. One restriction is that teachers are only able to use materials which do not infringe on copyright. This however motivates the creation of original content. Teachers collaborate to create such content and in the process, the strengths of different teachers are tapped on.

This presentation will share the ICT tools and resources available to augment the textbook, the pedagogical considerations in the planning of this unit and measures taken to address the problems faced in classroom management.

Presenters
LW

LEUAR WOAN KHI

Nanyang Girls' High School
YL

YAO LING YUN

Nanyang Girls' High School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm GMT+08
MR 308 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

Model Lesson 4: 215 The C3 Flipped Classroom
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

In the model lesson session, the presenters will share the school’s approach to:

  • Flipped Learning and Flipped Classrooms
  • ICT Professional Development (PD) for teachers
  • The use of ICT tools - EDpuzzle, Socrative and Nearpod
Flipped Learning and Flipped Classrooms
Leveraging on technology, a flipped classroom provides a flexible learning environment for students to learn and revisit concepts at their own pace. Students will be able to Construct knowledge, Clarify and Collaborate with their classmates and seek clarifications from their teachers.

ICT PD for teachers
The school has a structured ICT PD to provide teachers with the pedagogical strategies and tools to facilitate flipped learning effectively. Termly PD sessions are planned and teachers are grouped according to their readiness level. With these technological and pedagogical strategies, teachers work collaboratively to implement the flipped classroom.

The use of ICT tools
EDPuzzle, Socrative and Nearpod are self-directed and collaborative ICT tools which can be effectively used in flipped classrooms. These tools are available for Android and iOS applications. 

a) EDpuzzle
The website allows for “pop-up quizzes” to be embedded in videos at appropriate junctures. These quizzes allow for self-assessment and students are able to assess their level of understanding of the topic. Teachers are able to monitor students’ progress in order to redesign the next lesson to meet learning needs of their students. Through an EDpuzzle, students tap and build upon their prior knowledge through highly interactive lessons and hence, learning is self-paced and self-directed.

b) Socrative
It is a real-time assessment tool that engages and assesses students’ level of understanding of topics taught. Through the use of quizzes, polls and exit tickets, teachers are able to monitor students’ progress. These results allow teachers to clarify students’ misconceptions and provide instant feedback. Peer learning takes place as they learn from one another.

c) Nearpod
It enables teachers to share content with students and to manage the flow of the lesson in a "live" session. Students can receive multimedia content and participate in engaging assessment and collaborative activities. A teacher can create customised self-assessment quizzes to monitor students’ understanding of the topic and clarify their doubts. The ‘Draw It’ and ‘Open Ended Questions’ modules allow creative flexibility where teachers can pose a question, present a scenario or assign a creative writing task for students to collaborate and facilitate discussion. Students’ responses can then be generated in the form of a report.

Presenters
avatar for TAN CHAY TIN JASMINE

TAN CHAY TIN JASMINE

LEVEL HEAD SCIENCE, CHIJ (Katong) Primary
TW

TAN WAN ING VENUS

CHIJ (Katong) Primary
avatar for TRACEY HOA

TRACEY HOA

CHIJ (Katong) Primary



Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm GMT+08
MR 309 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

Spotlight 3: Mark Pegrum
Speakers
avatar for Mark Pegrum

Mark Pegrum

Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Western Australia
Mark Pegrum is an associate professor in the Faculty of Education at The University of Western Australia, where he specialises in mobile learning and, more broadly, e-learning. His teaching has been recognised through Faculty and University Excellence in Teaching Awards, as well as... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm GMT+08
Hall 406D Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

Panel Discussion 1: Reinforcing and Sustaining a Culture of Innovative Technology and Learning with ICT
Limited Capacity seats available

Culture building is an aspect of transformational leadership that can shape the consideration and the use of ICT in teaching and learning in an organisation.

What are values, assumptions and beliefs that are essential to a culture of innovative teaching and learning with ICT? What are the considerations in promoting the change needed for building deep culture where practices in innovative teaching and learning with ICT are reinforced and sustained?

Be involved in discussions, share your perspectives and seek insights and perspectives on the essential questions that can help you inspire and lead changes in your schools. Hear the views of our panel of experts as they share from their experiences in educational technology leadership and research.

Moderators
avatar for Cheah Horn Mun

Cheah Horn Mun

Assistant Provost, UniSIM
Associate Professor Cheah Horn Mun is the Assistant Provost of UniSIM and Dean of the School of Human Development & Social Services. Prior to his appointment at UniSIM, AP Cheah was the Director of the Educational Technology Division at the Ministry of Education, where he led the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Chan Poh Meng

Chan Poh Meng

President, Academy of Principals Singapore
Mr Chan Poh Meng is the President of the Academy of Principals Singapore (APS), a professional body which aims to provide an unparalleled level of support for school leaders as they lead schools into a new and exciting era of educational changes. APS also serves as an important platform... Read More →
avatar for Greg Whitby

Greg Whitby

Executive Director of Schools, Diocese of Parramatta
Greg Whitby has led a system of Catholic schools in the Dioceses of Parramatta and Wollongong (Australia) over the past 15 years. He is recognised as an innovative educator who is passionate about rethinking the nature of schooling in today's world and the role of learning environments... Read More →

Presenters
avatar for Jennifer Pei-Ling Tan

Jennifer Pei-Ling Tan

Research Scientist (Creativity, 21st Century Literacies & Learning), National Institute of Education
Dr. Jen Tan is a Research Scientist and Assistant Dean (Knowledge Mobilisation) at the Office of Education Research in the National Institute of Education, Singapore. She specializes in techno-pedagogical and curriculum innovations aimed at assessing and fostering 21C literacies and... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
MR 331 Suntec City Convention Hall

4:00pm GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Epson
Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

4:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 4/1: 627 Making Thinking Visible Using Screencasting Apps
Limited Capacity seats available

Harvard Graduate School (2007) advocates visible thinking, which makes extensive use of learning routines that are thinking rich. These simple structures can be used over and over again, across various grade levels and content, so that they become a process of learning for students.

This project aims to make thinking visible by training pupils in thinking routines using their senses to develop greater confidence and clarity of thoughts when presenting ideas, opinions and experiences in the learning of English and Mathematics.

Carruthers, Martinovic and Pearce (2014) observed that students who use screencasts to create their own artefacts or share their work with others exude more confidence and have the desire to progress. Although students can go to the white board and share their work in a traditional classroom setting, the hesitant ones are often reluctant to exhibit their weaknesses. However, sound pedagogy and instructional skills are necessary before embarking on the use of technology.

Leveraging the use of ICT tools, students make their thought processes visible by communicating their thoughts in speech and writing through annotation and visualisation in problem solving and Stimulus-based Conversations (SBC). Teachers can understand pupils’ thought process through the videos created when misconceptions, prior knowledge, reasoning ability and degrees of understanding are uncovered. Teachers can then address these challenges and extend pupils’ thinking.

Low to high progress lower to upper primary learners benefit from this approach as evidenced by both the quantitative and qualitative results gathered. Learners emerge confident of their problem-solving skills and certain of their thought processes.

Through the presentation of this paper, participants would gain exposure in the use and effectiveness of these screencasting apps in the disciplines of English and Mathematics. It is the belief of the team that this learning could be transferred across disciplines to nurture a confident person, a self-directed learner and an active contributor; 21st Century Competencies that our students would require to face the challenges of globalisation, changing demographics and technological advancements in the future.

Presenters
avatar for ADELINE ANG CHING LING

ADELINE ANG CHING LING

Senior Teacher, English Language, Clementi Primary School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
MR 310 Suntec City Convention Hall

4:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 4/2: 237 A Case Study On The Professional Growth Of Science Teachers Through Synergistic Partnerships In The Collaborative Science Inquiry (CSI) Learning Community
Limited Capacity seats available

ICT-supported inquiry-based learning has been recognised as an effective pedagogical approach in science learning. However, ICT-based learning activities are challenging for teachers to design and implement. Teachers’ needs also vary, with limited opportunities for them to share and address their concerns.

As professional learning communities are avenues to improve knowledge and skills among educators (DuFour, 2002), the Collaborative Science Inquiry (CSI) Learning Community (LC) was established by the Educational Technology Division (ETD), Ministry of Education, Singapore and aims to collaborate with Science teachers to deepen their ICT-supported inquiry practices through LC-led professional learning activities.

A case study is used to illustrate the partnership between ETD officers, a Lead Teacher and teachers from three secondary schools (Tampines, East View and St. Anthony's Canossian Secondary) in redesigning a Chemistry topic with ICT-infused Science practices.

In this partnership, individual strengths were harnessed: the Lead Teacher offered her subject knowledge and pedagogical skills; the ETD officers provided thought leadership for meaningful use of technologies; the teachers ensured that the redesigned lesson, while adhering to CSI design principles, was adapted for their unique student profiles.

The redesigned curriculum made students’ thinking visible through co-created digital artefacts useful for formative assessment. After each lesson enactment observed by all involved in the partnership, changes were made, based on student interactions observed, before re-enactment in another school. The last enactment in the third school also served as an Open Classroom for other members of the CSI LC, to collect diverse perspectives for further refinement, and to encourage professional discourse among LC members.

This partnership between ETD, Lead Teacher and teachers not only catalysed the adaptation of the CSI practice to unique school contexts, but also grew the teachers professionally. Findings from teacher reflections demonstrated that their ICT practices became more participatory and constructivist-oriented. Teachers’ professional growth was observed as outcomes in “The Competent Professional” and “The Collaborative Learner” of Teacher Growth Model (TGM), a representation of core learning areas for Singapore teachers’ holistic professional development.

The activities in the partnership were compared with Garet et al.’s (1999) identified features of “high quality” professional learning experiences that lead to teacher improvements. Participants will gain an insightful understanding of the structures and critical success factors of such a partnership that allows the LC to leverage strategic levelers through Lead Teachers, to gain access to their actively-participating teachers, to ensure the multiplication of the outcomes of the LC’s efforts.

Presenters
avatar for IVY AW

IVY AW

Educational Technology Officer, ETD, MOE
Ivy is an Education Technology Officer at the Ministry of Education, Singapore. With a passion to explore various technologies for meaningful student learning, she is currently co-leading the Collaborative Science Inquiry (CSI) Learning Community.
JK

JULIE KOH JOO KOEW

Tampines Secondary School
avatar for POH MENG LENG

POH MENG LENG

HOD ICT, Yishun Secondary School
Interested in dabbling in ICT tools in T&L.
QY

QIU YIRU

Ministry of Education


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
MR 327

4:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 4/3: 614 Composite Snapshot Of Design And Teaching Processes And Classroom Practices With ICT
Limited Capacity seats available

One of the primary foci of the Learning Partnerships in Education Technology (LPET) Branch, Education Technology Division (ETD), Ministry of Education, Singapore is collaboration with school partners in bringing about transformative use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) for learning in classrooms. Stemming from this focus, there has been a concerted effort towards a systemic view of the classroom design process and practice so as to derive underlying principles of learning, teaching and designing that are applicable to Singapore classrooms. This focus is also aligned with current research trends encouraging teachers to design technology-enriched learning processes and environments  that enhance students’ learning (Beetham and Sharpe, 2013; Goodyear and Dimitriadis, 2013; Goodyear and Retalis, 2010; Laurillard, 2012; Luckin, 2010).

Our paper presents a composite snapshot of design, teaching and classroom practices with ICT, compiled and synthesised from LPET’s school collaboration projects. To glean insights into the process of teachers designing learning experiences and learning environments with ICT, we examined the narratives of team members comprising teachers, Educational Technology Officers (ETOs) and research partners (RPs) from institutes of higher learning (IHL) as they engaged in and enacted the design process of ICT-enriched learning activities in classrooms. Our research was informed by literature that examines: (1) how people learn and how that influences learning design; (2) teaching approaches (i.e. teaching principles, strategies and practices) and their influences on learning; and (3) the role of teachers as designers. Our research questions are: (1a) What is the process that the team goes through in designing learning experiences and learning environments with ICT?; (1b) What is the narrative of the classroom practice resulting from the design?; and (2) How do the patterns of lesson design relate with classroom practice across the case studies? Data collected from collaborating schools include field notes on lesson design, observation logs of classroom enactment and teachers’ reflections.

Our preliminary findings suggest that the process of designing teaching and learning activities and enacting classroom practice vary depending on how teachers reconcile the tensions in various components of the design process. These components include learning objectives, roles of teachers and students, ICT use, modes of communication and interaction, etc. Surfacing these tensions and analysing how teachers reconcile them allows further investigation of how teachers design for learning with technology. The implications of our research could inform coaching of teachers in designing effective ICT lessons and in creating toolkits for teachers as learning designers.

Speakers
avatar for Teo Chew Lee

Teo Chew Lee

Lead Specialist, Educational Technology Division, Ministry of Education, Singapore
Dr Teo Chew Lee started off as a Science teacher, translating knowledge building theories and technology into practice in her Science lessons more than ten years ago. That experience established her philosophy of education in which students’ ideas and questions are the most powerful... Read More →

Presenters
CB

CHAI BOON YEN

Ministry of Education
TW

TAY WAN YING

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ

Organising Committee
NA

Nur Azarina

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ

Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
MR 328

4:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 4/4: 445 Enhancing Assessment Of Learning Through Technology To Improve Math Literacy
Limited Capacity seats available

The use of assessment for learning (AfL) has been critical in improving students’ learning and teachers’ teaching as both respond to the information it provides. It is imperative that the information gathered through assessment is effectively utilized through a continuous process to provide the bridge between teaching and learning. With the advancement of technology, ICT has been leveraged to enhance assessment of learning that goes beyond simply diagnose and identify students’ learning needs; it can be used to provide feedback to inform teachers’ pedagogical approaches and help learners plan and manage the next steps in learning. This session discusses the development of digital learning environments for learning mathematics and AfL guiding principles / approaches adopted by a group of mathematics teachers in a primary school in Singapore. Through the observation of lessons held in the classrooms, the teachers identified the need to incorporate interactive assessments that gives students timely targeted feedback that communicates progress and directs subsequent effort in a collaborative and non-threatening environment. By tapping web2.0 technologies (e.g. paddlet, Kahoots etc) and learning through gamification, the group of teachers successfully redesigned the learning environment that empowers students to take ownership in learning to improve math literacy and take learning beyond the classroom environment.

Presenters
GH

GAN HWEE PING

North Vista Primary
NC

NG CHUN HAO

North Vista Primary


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
MR 329

4:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 4/5: 336 Teaching Argumentative Writing Through A Synergy Of ICT-Enabled Learning Platforms To Facilitate AfL, SDL And CoL
Limited Capacity seats available

Writing well tends to be a difficult skill to teach: it is challenging to get students to write multiple drafts, tedious to grade, after all the effort, teachers wonder if students actually learn from the red comments they have painstakingly scribbled on paper. Thus, to help secondary three students master the structure and language features of argumentative writing through the process-genre approach, a Learning Management System: Schoology, together with 4 other ICT tools were used to build and expand students' content knowledge of argumentative topics (YouTube), understand writer's purpose and language features (Kahoot!), facilitate planning (popplet), drafting and peer review (Schoology), and giving of timely verbal feedback (Vocaroo). Kahoot is a game-based learning platform that challenges students to compete to answer MCQ questions, supplemented with videos or pictures, which is especially suited for deconstruction of text types. Popplet, a colourful mind-mapping tool, is best for planning of ideas before writing.

Survey revealed that students were more interested in the lessons and motivated to create multiple essay drafts and overcome the initial inertia to writing. Students' results also improved as they reaped the synergistic effect of positive peer pressure, immediate feedback and availability of online resources.

SDL: Central in this strategy, SDL occur when students review the resources in the folder (sample essays, videos, rubric, friends' drafts) before writing their essay and when they re-read or re-play teachers' individualised feedback on their drafts. As they explore the rich pool of resources, they extend their learning beyond the classroom. Students can also zoom into their unique area of weakness by choosing the resource they want to focus on to decide the direction of their learning.

CoL: When students review the feedback, the synergistic effect is twofold because apart from learning from their own mistakes, they also learn from their friends' mistakes and what they did well. As peer feedback provides a first cut in error analysis, teachers need not repeat similar comments. Essentially, this approach makes students work as hard as their teachers as students bear the brunt of improving their work.


AfL: Supported by literature, continual and immediate feedback is key to improving. Students' improvements can also be effectively and efficiently tracked. Since the teaching and learning is very transparent on Schoology, strategies to target specific classes can be easily formulated. Being able to easily store all resources online year after year also help in refining teaching and learning.

Moderators
avatar for ELAINE JEE

ELAINE JEE

Senior Educational Technology Officer, Ministry of Education
Elaine conducts classroom research on implementation principles for sustainable and scalable applications of ICT for enriched learning experiences. She has shared her findings at various international conferences. Elaine also promotes a culture of active experimentation and reflective... Read More →

Presenters
CJ

CHANG JIAPEI

Fairfield Methodist School (Secondary)
FK

FELICIA KUO

Fairfield Methodist School (Secondary)


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
MR 330

4:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 4/6: 251 Develop Students’ Argumentative Skills Through Problem-Based Learning Using ICT
Limited Capacity seats available

Students generally experience difficulty in writing an argumentative essay. This could be due to their inability to examine and analyze the topic critically or to find evidences to support their main points. Consequently, the work of the students tends to be lacking in content and demonstration of students’ critical thinking skills are not evident. Therefore, a partnership was formed with Educational Technology Division to develop the students to think critically through problem-based learning (PBL) using ICT. Hitherto, research studies revealed that PBL is an effective instructional approach to develop and promote transferable critical thinking skills amongst students, while they simultaneously acquire domain-specific knowledge or content in education as well as the medical field (Chee, 2001; Hmelo & Lin., 2000; Iwaoka & Rhee, 2010; Kek & Huijser, 2011; Shepherd, 1998; Sungur & Tekkaya. 2006; Vernon & Blake, 1992; Weissinger, 2004). Problem-based learning engaged students using a real-life scenario which required them to solve a problem. Using CoRT strategies and questions from Lynch and Wolcotts’ steps for better understanding, students are to work collaboratively in solving the problem. An online portal, ReACT portal and Google document were also used to document their thinking processes. At the end of the lesson, the students produced an argumentative essay based on the problem given. ReACT portal is an online platform designed to help create and deliver integrated self-assessments for the development of critical thinking skills. It seeks to assess and promote student’s development of the six critical thinking skills: deduction, analysis and evaluation, synthesis and classify, compare and contrast, problem-solving and creativity as prescribed in the Chinese Language syllabus SDL: With teachers serving as knowledge experts and facilitators in discussion, students exhibit drive and self-regulatory dispositions to manage flow and development of ideas through their research on the Internet. CoL: The approach promotes collaboration among pairs of students throughout the stages of design thinking. Through collective idea improvement, the community of learners deliberates on the diverse ideas for the purpose of refinement and solution development. The output, namely the analyses using CoRT thinking tools and the evidence found on the internet were saved on the Google document, and became a showcase of students’ cognitive processes and the trajectory of idea progression occurring during the social discourse. Initial findings suggested that students from class of Secondary Two Higher Chinese students and Express Chinese students have improved progressively in content generation after two rounds of curriculum intervention.

Presenters
CS

CHONG SHUR CHIN

Yuan Ching Secondary
RY

RAYMOND YEO TONG WEI

Yuan Ching Secondary School
YJ

YAP JEN HUEY

Yuan Ching Secondary School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
MR 333 Suntec City Convention Hall

4:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 4/7: 222 Case Studies And The Making Of wRiteFormula – A Mobile App Game To Teach Chemistry Nomenclature Of Ionic Substances, In Singapore Secondary Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation shares the case studies of using a meaningful Mobile App game and explores the process of making, wRiteFormula, to help beginner Chemistry students master ionic bonding nomenclature with less arduous memory work through gamification, timely feedback, and principles of discovery-learning in a social context. Impactful case studies and findings will be shared by project schools, on how they have successfully integrated the Mobile App game in their student-centred classrooms, with high levels of motivation and engagement observed, and learning gains attained.

Chemistry nomenclature is important as it provides a method for identifying chemical substances clearly and systematically, thus facilitating communication. However, beginner secondary school students often find nomenclature rules complicated, confusing and uninteresting, and are unmotivated to practise using these rules effectively and efficiently, thus hindering their progress in learning chemistry as they can neither communicate clearly nor ask productive questions.

The game was developed with funding from the National Research Foundation, Singapore, and is jointly managed by the Educational Technology Division, Ministry of Education, Singapore and the National Institute of Education, Singapore.



Presenters
AX

ANG XIU QIN

Ang Mo Kio Secondary School
FA

FARIDAH ABDUL GAPOR

Peicai Secondary School
HS

HARESH SIVARAM

Peirce Secondary School
JK

JOSHUA KHONG

Raffles Institution
KA

KEVIN ANDREW THESMAN

Ang Mo Kio Secondary School
LL

LIEW LI PIN

Raffles Institution
LC

LIM CHUI LING

Peicai Secondary School
LR

LOW RHUI YIN

Ang Mo Kio Secondary School
PG

PATRICIA GOH

Ngee Ann Secondary School
avatar for ZACHARY KANG

ZACHARY KANG

Teacher Mentor, Raffles Institution
I am passionate about making chemistry fun!


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
MR 334

4:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 4/8: 055 An Activity Theoretical Approach Towards Distributed Leadership For One-To-One Computing In A Singapore Elementary School
Limited Capacity seats available

Adopting the socio-cultural Activity Theoretical perspective, this ethnographic case study examined how distributed leadership supported one-to-one computing implementation in an elementary school under the FutureSchools@Singapore programme. The FutureSchools@Singapore programme aimed to develop prototypes for the seamless and pervasive use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to enhance teaching and learning in schools. 

Observations and field notes of significant events in relation to the implementation of one-to-one computing were triangulated by reviewing planning documents, reports and publications. Socio-cultural Activity Theory was used to examine how the distributed leadership of the school’s teaching community (i.e., the principal, ICT coordinator, curriculum coordinators and teachers) worked towards addressing the disturbances (disturbances are manifested as a result of the presence of systemic contradictions) of adopting one-to-one computing in the school.  The more significant actions and repair actions of the school’s teaching community to address the disturbances in implementing the one-to-one programme were highlighted, discussed and analysed.  The discussion of these actions was then used to formulate a more generalised one-to-one computing activity system where more meaningful analysis and interpretation could be made.  This in-depth analysis of the contradictions and tensions illuminated the less visible but very important social mediators: the relations between the subject, tool and object were mediated by these social factors (i.e., rules, community and division of labour).  There were physical infrastructure and technical issues in the integration of ICT into schools, but the socio-cultural factors (e.g., mindset and the level of acceptance of parents to procure computers for their children, teachers’ beliefs and practices in using ICT in their lessons and working with external agencies to fund the purchase of computing equipment for financially challenged students) were equally, if not, more important in the implementation process. 

This ethnographic case study with a focus on distributed leadership also serves as an instance of the implementation of a one-to-one programme in an elementary school for sharing, emulation and further refinements by others.  In other words, this chapter presents a useful empirical case study resource for those who are in the field of educational technology for the purpose of ICT integration and one-to-one computing in schools.


Presenters
LC

LIM CHER PING

Hong Kong Institute of Education
TL

TAY LEE YONG

Dean Development, Research & Technology, Beacon Primary School


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
MR 335

4:30pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 4/9: 299 Facilitating Conceptual Understanding in Science
Our teachers observed that students have varied and mostly inaccurate conceptual understanding of how the world around them works. These misconceptions must be corrected before the students can assimilate new information introduced to them. At other times, well-prepared students with preconceived answers may also become close-minded and hinder the spirit of inquiry learning. 

This presentation focuses on how the science teachers of Palm View Primary School attempt to leverage on the affordance of technology to challenge students' conceptual understanding as a form of engagement, facilitate discussion and collaborative learning to bring about conceptual understanding and change. 

Posner, Strike, Hewson and Gertzog (1982) suggested four essential conditions for conceptual change. They are: (1) Dissatisfaction - students realize there are some inconsistencies when their way of thinking does not solve the problem at hand. (2) Intelligibility - students get opportunities to argue their own interpretations of events and relationship so that they become aware of their pre-instruction conceptions. (3) Plausibility - students get opportunities to apply the concepts in a new context. (4) Fruitfulness - the new concept opens up new areas of inquiry. 

This presentation is based on an on-going study on two Primary 3 and 4 Science class comprising students of mixed abilities. The teachers incorporate students’ daily activities and experiences as units of their learning design. These insertions ensure that the learning experiences are contextualised and act as relevant triggers to help students begin the process of conceptual change. Leveraging on the affordances of mobile devices and cloud-based tools, the students were able to extend their learning experiences from the class, to the school compound, leading eventually to personal learning spaces out of the school. This provides the students with a pool of rich and diverse life experiences which they can share and harness as ideas and learning resources to be gained in one context and applied in another. 

Our preliminary results suggest that in such learning environment, students are more able to address scientific misconceptions. Every student had to reflect and resolve the conceptual conflict before integrating and applying the new understanding and concepts into their lives. Teachers who embarked on this study agree that the students were engaged and demonstrated dispositions of inquiring minds. The students had also expressed that the experience had allowed them to rectify many misconceptions that they previously assumed was true.

Presenters
LY

LIM YONG SENG GENE

Palm View Primary School
XJ

XIAO JIANFU

Palm View Primary


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
MR 336

4:30pm GMT+08

HOD ICT Track with Jamie Neuwirth
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Neuwirth

Jamie Neuwirth

Regional Program Manager, Google Education
Jamie is a Regional Program Manager for Google Education and works with districts to successfully pilot, deploy, and scale Google tools like Apps for Education and Chromebooks. Previously, Jamie was a classroom teacher in Arkansas, and graduated from Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm GMT+08
Main Hall (404AX#,405BX - 406CX) Suntec City Convention Hall

4:30pm GMT+08

Meet the Practitioners 3: Developing Critical Viewing in Secondary English Language through Multi-Modal Literacy
Limited Capacity seats available

Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm GMT+08
MR 332 Suntec City Convention Hall

4:30pm GMT+08

Model Lesson 5: 495 Humanities ALIVE! - Enchancing the Learning Experience of the Humanities through the Use of ICT in an Authentic Setting
Limited Capacity seats available

In the 2010 NE Survey, the Secondary 2 student cohort’s score for 78 out of 100 in the “Defence” domain score, a dip from the 2008 survey finding. In view of this result, Clementi Town Secondary School (CTSS) Humanities and ICT Departments, together with the National Education (NE) Unit, pioneered the use of LOTM (Learning Tool On the Move), to engage students’ appreciation and understanding of Social Defence, an area of concern for CTSS.

The team conceptualised a curriculum innovation project using mobile technologies. The outcome was a Field-Based Smartphone-Facilitated Trail around Clementi neighbourhood for students to develop their appreciation of Singapore’s defence capabilities that would appeal to the digital natives of today.

The team aligned the innovation to the Upper Social Studies Curriculum and tapped the immediate neighbourhood for broadening and deepening students’ knowledge. In addition, situating the learning in the neighbourhood helped students connect the relevance of the lessons learnt in their classroom to real issues. The inquiry approach was also used to foster critical thinking skills and knowledge construction, which helped students make sense of data through questioning to order to deepen and construct knowledge for themselves.

The assessment of the effectiveness of the Clementi Trail was done through student perception surveys, qualitative feedback from students and staff, and a study of the student responses. Not only did the post-mobile trail perception survey show an increase in student acquisition of the desired values, the students also found this mode of learning engaging. Since 2012, CTSS NE Student Ambassadors have customised the trail for the primary schools in the cluster and have carried this out as part of the signature Singapore Footprints (trail around ethnic enclaves) for all CTSS Secondary 3 cohorts. The trail was also highlighted in the Humanities Educators Conference, 2012 and was shared with the then Minster of Education, Mr Heng Swee Keat.

The trail is indeed a testimony to the impact of the students’ learning beyond their classroom. It has received numerous accolades, including the MOE Innergy (Silver) Award 2014. In 2015, it was also further refined to include the natural heritage and history of Clementi, and was conducted for the public as part of the school’s contribution to Singapore’s SG50 Celebrations.

moderator: toh_wee_teck@moe.gov.sg 

Presenters
KB

KAMAL BIN YACOB

Clementi Town Secondary
SE

SANDY EE

Clementi Town Secondary
TM

TAN MUHAMMAD HAFIDZUDDIIN

Clementi Town Secondary
YB

YEHIDAAH BEEVI SHAIK

Clementi Town Secondary



Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm GMT+08
MR 308 Suntec City Convention Hall

4:30pm GMT+08

Model Lesson 6: 503 Flipping the Classroom to Develop Engaged Learners
Limited Capacity seats available

In our efforts to help students thrive in an ever-changing Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous (VUCA) world, it has become necessary for teachers to inculcate 21st Century skills and competencies for students’ engagement and learning. Teachers in the Mathematics and Science departments at Yishun Secondary School thus felt the need to explore different research-based educational strategies in the classroom to motivate and stretch students’ thinking. Taking into consideration the ease and pervasiveness of ICT technology in the lives of our students, we explored a Flipped Classroom approach in the teaching of Mathematics and Chemistry on specific Lower Secondary and Upper Secondary classes over a one-year duration.



The Flipped Classroom approach provided an opportunity to retain the essence of classroom teaching yet increase the level of student engagement and improve the quality of teacher-student interactions in the classroom. To augment learning experiences, content was selected and organised based on the domains of learning in Bloom’s Taxonomy. Learning experiences were also organised for easy, unambiguous and engaging comprehension outside the classroom. In class, appropriate tasks for assessment and feedback were conducted to promote active learning, strengthen self-efficacy and enhance assessment of learning. Professional conversations between the Mathematics and Chemistry teacher encouraged reflective practices to plan, execute, review and refine lessons that optimised curriculum time for learner-centred activities.



Although the premise of student engagement depended on the student’s ‘flow state’ (Csikszentmihalyi, 1990), Flipped Classroom encouraged personalised feedback and attention in class and supported differentiated assignment tasks that premised on developing and sustaining students’ intrinsic motivation towards learning Mathematics and Chemistry. To sustain our concerted efforts to provide students with the opportunity to learn at their own pace and improve on their metacognitive and collaborative strategies, teachers continuously reviewed and refined lesson packages and explored various ICT tools to provide for varied learning experiences that impacted student learning outcomes.



This workshop takes participants through the deeper insights and challenges gleaned from our ongoing efforts to design and innovate Flipped Classroom lesson packages. It also takes participants through the design of online resources to create Flipped Classroom lessons in their subject area. A brief insight on some collaborative tools that participants can use to promote classroom discussions to engage learners will also be shared. Lastly, the workshop unpacks how students’ responses can be used to shape follow-up learning activities within and outside of the classroom to develop engaged learners for the 21st century.

Participants are strongly encouraged to have a mobile device or electronic device that would allow them to access the model lesson with greater convenience.


Presenters
AK

ALBERT KANG

Teacher, Yishun Secondary School
SG

SIMMI GOVINDANI

Lead Teacher, Yishun Secondary School



Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm GMT+08
MR 309 Suntec City Convention Hall

5:00pm GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Google For Education
Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall
 
Thursday, March 31
 

9:00am GMT+08

Keynote 3: Diana Laurillard
Speakers
avatar for Diana Laurillard

Diana Laurillard

Professor of Learning with Digital Technologies, Department of Culture, Communication and Media, London Knowledge Lab
Diana Laurillard is Professor of Learning with Digital Technologies at the London Knowledge Lab, UCL Institute of Education where she leads research projects on developing a learning design support environment for teachers, the Design of MOOCs for professional development and research... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am GMT+08
Main Hall (404AX#,405BX - 406CX) Suntec City Convention Hall

10:00am GMT+08

Morning Tea Break
Thursday March 31, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

10:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 022 Understanding Resonance Graphs using Easy Javascript Simulationrs (EJsS) and Why We Use EJS
This paper reports a computer model- simulation created using Easy JavaScript Simulation (EJsS) http://www.um.es/fem/EjsWiki/ for learners to visualize how the steady-state amplitude of a driven oscillating system varies with the frequency of the periodic driving force. The simulation shows (N=100) identical spring-mass systems being subjected to (1) periodic driving force of equal amplitude but different driving frequencies and (2) different amount of damping. The simulation aims to create a visually intuitive way of understanding how the series of amplitude versus driving frequency graphs are obtained by showing how the displacement of the system changes over time as it transits from the transient to the steady state. 

A suggested “how to use” the model is added to help educators and students in their teaching and learning, where we explained the theoretical steady state equation, time conditions when the model starts allowing data recording of maximum amplitudes to closely match the theoretical equation and steps to collect different runs of degree of damping. 

We also discuss two design features in our computer model: A) displaying the instantaneous oscillation together with the achieved steady state amplitudes and B) explicit world view overlay with scientific representation with different degrees of damping runs. 

Three advantages of using EJsS include 1) Open Source Codes and Creative Commons Attribution Licenses for scaling up of interactively engaging educational practices 2) models made can run on almost any device including Android and iOS and 3) allows for redefining physics educational practices through computer modeling.

Webpage to share:

http://iwant2study.org/ospsg/index.php/interactive-resources/physics/02-newtonian-mechanics/09-oscillations/88-shm24

Download and unzip for offline use: 

http://iwant2study.org/ospsg/index.php/interactive-resources/physics/02-newtonian-mechanics/09-oscillations/88-shm24


Or click this link to run the model:

http://iwant2study.org/lookangejss/02_newtonianmechanics_8oscillations/ejss_model_SHM24/SHM24_Simulation.xhtml

Source code editable using EJS 5.1 and above: 

http://iwant2study.org/lookangejss/02_newtonianmechanics_8oscillations/ejss_src_SHM24.zip

ICTLT slides
https://youtu.be/dK5kel4fXOE
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dK5kel4fXOE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


Video poster:
https://youtu.be/tl4hfZ3TR6U

Presenters
CC

CHARLES CHEW

Academy of Singapore Teachers
DW

DARREN WONG

Ministry of Education
avatar for LAWRENCE WEE

LAWRENCE WEE

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
@lookang



Thursday March 31, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

10:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 241 Transforming Culture of Learning in the Digital Age
To support the vision of 21st century learning, Institute of Technical Education (ITE) had established a digital education culture throughout ITE students’ learning journey that enables all lecturers and students to stay connected on and off campus; collaborating with peers, creating knowledge, managing learning and monitoring progress. ITE has been developing substantial frameworks over the years to adopt technology-enhanced learning to engage, motivate, and inspired learners of all ages. In 2000 to 2004 under ITE Breakthrough strategic plan to create a world-class technical education institution for a knowledge-based economy, our curriculum was redesigned to create an IT-based teaching and learning environment for our students. Our first learning management system, eTutor, was implemented in 2002 to focus on the pillars of connectivity and accessibility. We had built a community of connected on-line learning campuses that allowed our students to access course material anywhere, anytime. Lecturers were trained to develop interactive courseware for self-directed learning. In 2005 to 2009 under ITE Advantage strategic plan to propel ITE into a global leader in technical education, our education became a key pillar to stay competitive in Singapore workforce and economy. ITE had developed the taxonomic role-play pedagogic model, iDe’Lite, for teaching and learning of Service Skills using video-based technology. Lecturers used various video editing, screen capture and screen recorder software to develop self-taught video content to inculcate students’ independent learning. Finally, in 2015 to 2019, the new ITE strategic plan - ITE Trailblazer had aspired to blaze new trails in teaching and learning, through use of ICT-enabled and teaching methods tailored to different disciplines. New learning management system, MyConnexion, is implemented. It provides a greater flexibility to engage both lecturers and students in teaching and learning with a more user friendly interfaces that encompasses various Web 2.0 collaborative tools. ITE has started BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) program in some of the courses from 2014 to 2015. The transition to mobile devices and digital curriculum redefine our educational approach through greater incorporation of info-comm technology, reinvent our learning spaces, and adopt discipline-specific teaching methods. Every ITE student will have more opportunities for authentic, flexible and self-directed learning, both in and out of ITE. This will prepare them to be active, skilled, creative, and ethical contributors to the global economy.

Presenters
CY

CHOW YUEN CHOY

Institute of Technical Education
DC

DANIEL CHOO

Institute of Technical Education
IL

IRENE LEE

Institute of Technical Education
YC

YANG CHING KAI

Institute of Technical Education


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

10:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 309 Promoting Reading of Chinese Books Through Teachers' Modelling and Students' Participation in Online Community for Reading
Reading is a source of comprehensible input which may contribute significantly to a general language competence that underlies both spoken and written performance (Krashen, 1989). Reading helps learners to acquire language naturally. If students read more and enjoy it, they will become better readers (Gardiner, 2005).

However, it is challenging to promote reading of Chinese language (CL) books among students in Singapore. A recent survey affirmed that students would not read CL books if given a choice.

To alleviate this issue, an approach known as “Sustained Silent Reading through Modeling and Structure (MSSR) with ICT” by Chien, Chen, Ko and Chen (2011) was piloted in four primary schools since 2014, and has since scaled to nine other primary schools in 2015. The key principles of this approach are: 1) reading is fun; 2) reading is done in a conducive, joyful and stress-free environment, with teachers modeling sustained silent reading alongside students in class; 3) ownership of reading and choice of books are upon the students, not on the teachers; 4) after-reading activities, like face-to-face discussions and multimodal book recommendations in the online portal, are voluntary.

To further encourage ownership and sustainability of reading, each student is assigned a virtual bookshop to manage in the “Read & Share@MyBookShop” online portal. This portal comes with a point system to reward “high-performing bookshop managers”, who have read and recommended books in their respective bookshops to “sell” to their peers, via different modes of presentation, for example, using texts, drawing, and/ or audio/ video recording. Every time a peer adds a recommended book to his to-read list, this manager has “sold” a book and earns points as rewards. Points awarded can be used to exchange for items to decorate the virtual bookshop to attract more peers to come by and “purchase” recommended books.

Such activities are more motivating and engaging than submission of pen-and-paper book records. Moreover, teachers and students have become members of an online community of reading. The social interactions within the community enable members to sustain their interest in reading and sometimes even widen the genres of book students are usually accustomed to.

Preliminary findings show that MSSR can motivate students in reading more CL books as they learn by imitation. However, more data is required to conclude whether the online portal and community for reading can foster and sustain the interest and habit in CL reading for primary school children.

Presenters
LJ

LEE JO KIM

Ministry of Education
LT

LOW TAN YING

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
SY

SOH YAN PENG

Ministry of Education
SH

SOON HONG LIM

Ministry of Education


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

10:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 480 Collin's World: Applying Digital Game Design Principles to Build Empathy and Peer Support Skills
There is a growing interest in using digital game-based approach beyond academic subjects to teach character and social skills. In particular, role-playing games provide a simulated environment for players to experience realistic social situations and to solve complex problems. The design principles in role-playing games that can support learning of social skills are as follows: 1) engage the students with narrative, 2) use information to solve complex problems, 3) provide consequences and choices, and 4) provide feedback on their actions in a simulated world (Squire, Jenkins, Holland, Miller, O'Driscoll, Tan, & Todd, 2003). 

This presentation introduces Collin’s World, a new digital game designed to build empathy and peer support skills in students to manage the issues they face online. The main character, Collin is a friendly and helpful student in a Singapore school. His classmates feel comfortable talking to him when they run into difficulties online, e.g., excessive gaming, buying things online safely, cyber bullying and caring for their friends’ online safety. In this game, students will take on Collin’s identity and go through scenarios where they can decide whether or not to help their friends. The game will unfold base on the decisions they make. Sometimes, they can enter Brain World to complete mini-quests. These quests help them to gain tools and knowledge to manage these online challenges. The presentation will include the key features of the game, focusing on how they are based on game design principles and how schools are using the game to build empathy and peer support skills. In addition, the team will share the project evaluation and some preliminary findings.

Presenters
DN

DALTON NG

Ministry of Education
LP

LIEW PEI CHIN

Ministry of Education
NP

NEDUMARAN PRABAVATHY

Ministry of Education, Singapore
TL

TAN LILY

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

10:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 531 Sustaining Professional Learning for Technology Use in the Classroom
This e-poster documents a case study of ICT Good Practices @ Schools program, and captures the narrative in five stages namely (i) The Challenge, (ii) The Design, (iii) The Insights, (iv) The Re-designed, and (v) The Study.

In Singapore, there were various platforms for schools to share their approaches, strategies on ICT planning and implementation. However, the good practices shared may not be translated into their existing school practices, resulting unevenness of ICT practices at the ground level.

With this challenge, it prompts the conceptualization of Good Practice-Adapting Practice (GP-AP) Schools Learning Programme to help schools adapt and sustain good ICT practices. The design of the GP-AP Schools Learning program involves the following phases: (i) create knowledge – build community knowledge about the practice upon contextualisation, (ii) develop networks – form Communities of Practice (CoPs) across various subjects to explore ICT in common areas of focus, (iii) learn and develop practice – design, enactment and refinement of classroom experiences through action research, and (iv) take action as a community – engage in learning conversations with ETD, NIE and Schools to link theories to practice and promote evidence-based practices.

The evaluation of GP-AP Schools Learning Program was conducted through interviews and feedback from the school teams, NIE partners and ETOs supporting the school teams. These gave rise to insights on the need to provide differentiated support for teachers, and the importance of school leadership to sustain ICT practices.

With these insights, it prompted a re-designed frame to the GP-AP Schools Learning Program. Two new aspects i.e. empowered school team and sustainable ICT practices in MOE were introduced, giving rise to the re-designed program - ICT Good Practices @ Schools (iGPS). Such efforts will be captured through a study which aims to understand the teachers’ design process. It also aims to study the role of technology in deepening student learning.

Presenters
avatar for FARLINAH SUPAAH

FARLINAH SUPAAH

Educational Technology Officer, Ministry of Education, Singapore
Farlinah Supaah is an educational technology professional developer and consultant for the Educational Technology Division within the Ministry of Education, Singapore. With 19 years of teaching experience under her belt, including 7 years as a Head of Department in Information Technology... Read More →
GJ

GOH JIANG WEE ALAN

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
GC

GRACE CHOY PUI MAN

Ministry of Education


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

10:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 555 Learning Chemistry with wRiteFormula
This e-poster shares how the use of a mobile app game, wRiteFormula, has enhanced the teaching and learning of ionic compound nomenclature, a topic that students often find complicated and confusing.

When taught through the traditional approach of didactic instruction, drill-and-practice exercises, and delayed, generic feedback from the teacher, students are unmotivated to practice using nomenclature rules effectively and efficiently. This results in students’ poor working knowledge of the “grammar” of chemistry that hinders their ability to communicate and impedes their progress in learning chemistry (Chimeno, Wulfsberg, Sanger, & Melton, 2006; Kavak, 2012; Wirtz, Kaufmann, & Hawley, 2006).

To address these issues, the team incorporated game features into wRiteFormula as gamification has been shown to arouse students’ interest and motivate students (Bunchball, 2012; Kavak, 2012). In wRiteFormula, progressive difficulty levels systematically introduce nomenclature rules, and immediate, specific, actionable feedback is provided for mistakes. All games are recorded in an online content management system (CMS), thus the teacher can review a students’ performance at any time. More importantly, the teacher can control the game difficulty level through the CMS.

Instead of the traditional approach, teachers used a discovery-learning approach adapted from Wirtz et al. (2006). First, the teacher set the game difficulty level, and students played several rounds of the game. Next, students worked in small groups to discuss their observations and attempt to elicit the relevant ionic compound nomenclature rules based on the games played. Thereafter, the teacher facilitated a class discussion to consolidate students’ learning. The teacher then increased the game difficulty level, and the cycle repeated until students had deduced all the necessary nomenclature rules.

Both students and teachers provided positive feedback regarding the use of wRiteFormula for learning and teaching ionic compound nomenclature. Students found the game fun and challenging, while teachers found it easier to facilitate discussions and address misconceptions when they did not have to constantly provide feedback to students.

wRiteFormula was developed in an eduLab project with funding from the National Research Foundation, Singapore jointly managed by the Educational Technology Division (ETD), Ministry of Education (MOE), Singapore and the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. The project team comprised teachers from Ang Mo Kio Secondary, Ngee Ann Secondary, Peicai Secondary, Raffles Institution, and the Technologies for Learning Branch, ETD, MOE, Singapore.

Presenters
CP

CHIA PEI XIAN

Ministry of Education
QY

QIU YIRU

Ministry of Education
TC

THONG CHEE HING

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

10:00am GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 628 Teaching and Learning Guidelines for the Use of ICT in Pre-School Centres

MOE drafted a set of teaching and learning guidelines for the use of ICT in pre-school centres. The draft guidelines provide position statements with regard to teacher’s use of ICT in the classroom for children from 4 to 6 years. Based on the belief that children learn best when they engage in concrete, hands-on experiences and quality interactions, the teacher’s role is critical in ensuring that the use of ICT is thoughtful and intentional. The presentation would highlight the important findings from the literature and country scans which have informed the drafting of the guidelines. Examples of meaningful and appropriate use of ICT in pre-school classrooms and considerations to safeguard children’s health and social emotional well-being would also be shared at the presentation.


Presenters
CJ

CHAN JINGJING

Ministry of Education
JC

JULIET CHIA SUET LING

Ministry of Education


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

10:00am GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Marshall Cavendish Education
Thursday March 31, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

10:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 5/1: 378 Digital Storytelling To Enhance Learning
Limited Capacity seats available

Digital storytelling is essentially storytelling with video, audio narration or music. The team embarked on digital storytelling for the students because it generates interest and motivation for IT savvy students to create personal recounts or narratives. It capitalizes on their creativity to plan and research for their work, to synthesize and utilize the extremely rich content of the internet.

In the process of constructing their narratives, students ask questions, form opinions and vocalize their ideas. They pick up cooperative learning skills when they collaborate with and critique their peers’ work. Their IT skills improve when they learn to add audio narration to their digital content. Since their end products are meant for a wide and diverse audience, they need to ensure that their stories are cogent, coherent and presentable. Their presentations are archived digitally.

The programme was rolled out for the Primary 3 students with 1 pilot class and the 6 other mixed-abilities classes. The entire pilot project lasted about 2 months and it included preparation of materials, refinement of lessons and implementation. The pilot class had 5 lessons of 3 periods each. Data collected included pre and post tests and a perception quiz. Students have given favourable feedback that they enjoyed this mode of learning.

The teachers benefit too from using digital storytelling as a teaching tool. They can use their students’ work as an anticipatory activity to arouse interest or as catalysts for discussions. They can also be integrated into the curriculum to teach values. Imagine the power of digital storytelling when applied throughout the whole school, the amount of student-centric resources created and how engaged the students will be when digital storytelling is part of the school instruction.

The presenters would also share the tools employed for digital storytelling, the creation of ebooks and the use of Learning Management System (LMS). From the sharing, audience could use some of the ideas to shape their own students’ learning.

Presenters
avatar for ELAINE JEE

ELAINE JEE

Senior Educational Technology Officer, Ministry of Education
Elaine conducts classroom research on implementation principles for sustainable and scalable applications of ICT for enriched learning experiences. She has shared her findings at various international conferences. Elaine also promotes a culture of active experimentation and reflective... Read More →
KK

KONG KUM CHEONG

Ministry of Education
RT

RENA TAN

Ministry of Education
SG

SHAMINI GOPAL KRISHNASAMY

Ministry of Education


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am GMT+08
MR 327

10:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 5/2: 156 Digital Citizenship In The 21st Century – From Engagement To Advocacy. School of Science and Technology, Singapore students’ perspectives
Limited Capacity seats available

Technological innovations have impacted the way we learn, live and work at such an alarming rate in this century. Imagine the possibilities that technology can offer in order to future proof our children. Our students today belong to a generation of digital natives who are constantly connected via the various media. According to Marc Prensky* (2001b), “… today’s students think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors.”

They are “digital natives,” born into the digital age. These digital natives have fundamentally different expectations of access and interactions with technology. Recognising this, there is no doubt that school plays a critical role in shaping one's attitude and behaviour. The probing questions, among others, include: (1) how do we approach Digital Citizenship programme in schools, and (2) what are the contributing factors should we consider in the design of the Digital Citizenship programme. The implications of these questions are profound but one thing is clear - educators must equip our students with the necessary competencies to be more discerning with information and be able to make well-informed decisions within the peripheral of sound moral values.

In the School of Science and Technology, Singapore (SST) Student Development Programme envisions all its students to be lifelong learners of character who are active local and global citizens and dynamic leaders in service of humanity. The Digital Citizenship Programme, subsumed under the Student Development Education, complements the academic programmes in the educational technology enabled environment.

This programme aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills of how they can navigate and act safely and responsibly in the cyberspace. They will learn how to exhibit appropriate online behaviour that reflects the honesty, respect and consideration. In other words, through the Digital Citizenship we hope to raise a generation of students who think critically, act responsibly, and interact positively in the digital world and beyond. In SST, Digital Citizenship is about engagement and empowerment of students of cyber advocates.

In this presentation, we will share with participants how the term “digital citizenship” is redefined in the SST context. The SST cyber wellness student ambassadors’ will be sharing their perspectives on matters related to Cyber Wellness. The students will also be presenting on their active involvements as student advocators and leaders on the various initiatives at school-wide level as well as their involvement at the National Cyber Wellness Student Ambassadors Programme.

Presenters
avatar for LOH KWAI YIN

LOH KWAI YIN

HOD, Special Projects, School of Science and Technology, Singapore
In her 22 years in the education service, Kwai Yin has taught Mathematics, Computer Applications and Elements of Office Administration. In 2009, Kwai Yin joined the School of Science and Technology, Singapore (SST) as one of the pioneer staff, overseeing the ICT department and the... Read More →
avatar for NUR JOHARI BIN SALLEH

NUR JOHARI BIN SALLEH

Senior Teacher (Mathematics), School of Science and Technology, Singapore
Mr Nur Johari, 41, is the Senior Teacher (Mathematics), School of Science and Technology, Singapore. He believes that the inculcation of values form an integral part of teaching and has spent a large portion of his time reaching out to his students who are less-privileged. His motivational... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am GMT+08
MR 328

10:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 5/3: 583 Reframing Reasoning And Communication Opportunities In An ICT-Enriched Mathematics Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

As mathematics educators, how do we help students make sense of the concepts in Measurement in ways that are meaningful to them? For many years, teachers have exposed students to the use of manipulatives in the learning and teaching of these concepts but students’ reasonable sense of length, mass, volume and time remains a constant challenge. Students still face difficulties when they are in upper levels with their understanding of measurement, especially in upper primary topics like Area and Perimeter and Volume.

In this paper, Mayflower Primary School seeks to understand how lower primary students can acquire deeper conceptual understanding of Measurement through the reframing of reasoning and communication opportunities in the ICT-enriched mathematics classroom.

The team will share the experience of how the teachers had re-framed the lens in designing learning experiences which focused on providing opportunities for students to be engaged in inductive reasoning and communication processes to enhance the conceptual understanding of three fundamental principles of Measurement: Conservation, Transitivity and Unit Iteration (P.L. Koay, “Teaching Primary School Mathematics”) in an ICT-enriched learning environment. In particular, two iterations of lesson units (1.Time, 2.Volume) were designed and conducted in two Primary Two classes. In the lessons, manipulatives and concrete experiences were used to allow students to construct meaning and understanding.

The team has leveraged an ICT-enriched classroom to provide opportunities for mass engagement of students in making their thinking visible to the teachers and peers as opposed to a traditional mathematics classroom. The affordances of ICT have greatly strengthened the ‘Processes’ component of the Singapore Mathematics framework which includes reasoning, communication and connections (Primary Mathematics Teaching and Learning Syllabus, 2013).

The team will share with participants how teachers made use of the teacher-directed inquiry approach to engineer classroom discussions, activities, and learning tasks that lead students to explore, investigate and find their own answers. Evidence of learning was elicited by providing guidance through carefully crafted questions and tasks hosted in purposefully selected ICT platforms. With the learning made visible in such a classroom, students benefitted from the immediate feedback provided by their teachers and peers. The teachers were able to provide timely feedback real time to move learning forward. Opportunities for collaboration among the students have also increased as they were activated as learning resources for one another (W. Dylan, “Embedded Formative Assessment”) to provide peer feedback.

Presenters
LO

LYNNE ONG

Mayflower Primary School
SZ

SITI ZUBAIDAH SAMSUDIN

Mayflower Primary School
avatar for YIP JEE CHENG JESSIE

YIP JEE CHENG JESSIE

School Staff Developer, Mayflower Primary
We are a group of passionate math educators who are interested in engaging pupils in inductive reasoning and communication in the learning of mathematics. We believe that this is the way to engage our pupils in - enjoying math, - making sense of math and - recognizing the... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am GMT+08
MR 329

10:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 5/4: 086 Making Learning Statistics Applicable In Real World Context For Secondary One Normal Technical (NT) Students – Deepening Mathematics Learning With Mobile Technologies – A Case Study
Limited Capacity seats available

One of the challenges faced by Mathematics teachers in the Normal Technical (NT) classes is to design lessons that allow Secondary One NT Mathematics students to experience and apply what they learned in their classroom in the real world context. Students need to experience that the mathematics concepts and skills acquired in the classroom are relevant in the real world. They need to develop numeracy, reasoning, thinking skills, and problem solving skills through the learning and application of mathematics (G. Polya, "How to Solve It", 2nd Ed., Princeton University Press, 1957). Such authentic design lessons would offer these students the opportunities for creative work and moments of enlightenment and joy, which will eventually motivate them to have positive attitudes towards the learning of mathematics.

Lave and Wenger (1991) argue that learning is situated within authentic activities and context. They highlighted that learning is more likely to take place when the learners can put what they learned to use immediately in authentic situations. With the theoretical underpinnings and student needs in mind, the teachers from Manjusri Secondary School Singapore and officers from Ministry of Education Singapore came together to co-design and customise a school-based innovative Statistics lesson to pique secondary one NT students’ interest in learning mathematics.

Literature reviews have highlighted how technology, in the form of mobile devices, have served as mediating tools, allowing students to capitalise on the situation and encouraging communication and archiving (Shih, Chuang, & Hwang, 2010; Tan & So, 2011). In this innovative curriculum, the lessons are designed to connect what they learned in Mathematics with Computer Applications (CPA) knowledge and situating them in a real world context, supported by the use of mobile devices and applications such as Padlet, Google Sites, Google Forms and Google Sheets.

In this presentation, we will share how the Secondary One NT students use the mobile devices and Google Apps to record contextual information and how technologies can be embedded with scaffolds to guide data collection and facilitate interaction in a real world setting. Our findings showed that these technology-supported lessons have deepened students’ understanding of statistical application and interest in mathematics. One of the teachers reflected, “The hands-on data collection (in the field) and interpretation was essential for (the students) to make connection with their statistics topic.”

Finally, conference participants will learn critical success factors and how we circumvent challenges and how our design considerations can be adapted for use in a different subject area or context. 

Presenters
NC

NELSON CHONG NAI SHUN

MOE, Educational Technology Division
NC

NEO CHAI MENG

Manjusri Secondary School
NL

NUR LIYANA BINTE AMRUN

Education Officer, MANJUSRI SECONDARY SCHOOL


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am GMT+08
MR 330

10:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 5/5: 333 A Practice-Based Approach To Assessment Design In Student-Generated Video Projects
Limited Capacity seats available

Video-making had been increasingly adopted as a learning activity for students in Singapore, arguably with the availability of cheaper and more user-friendly video-editing software interfaces. With the learning activity typically actualizing into a video product, this has also made possible using student-generated videos as a form of summative assessment.

This presentation will discuss how teachers reflect on assessment considerations and how they think they have incorporated pedagogical purposes, stakes involved for students and its interpretations into their assessment designs of student-generated videos. It also highlights students’ concerns in undertaking and being assessed through video projects. This presentation aims to better inform assessment considerations in student-generated video projects as authentic assessment and help teachers design better informed lesson plans, formative assessment outputs and scoring rubrics for student-generated videos.

The methods deployed in this on-going study involves documentation analyses of selected modules taught in NUS High School, participant observations of three teachers, two teacher interviews and two student focus group discussion of five students per group. In Bloom’s digital taxonomy, video-making represents the highest skill-set of creating and allows the practice of 21st Century Competencies skills like communicating, collaborating, processing of information critically and inventively (Lightie, 2011).

Assessment design influences the rigour, equity of effort and technical mastery students need to demonstrate, especially in terms of their mastery of their 21st Century Competencies skills. Kearney and Schuck (2004) argued that video generation, as an integral part of student’s learning is relatively under-explored with few studies detailing the learning that occurs through the production of videos by students. Assessment considerations are similarly under-researched.

Studies like the British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (BECTA) Report had tried to show that teachers focused on the editing quality and subject content when facilitating video-making as a learning activity (Burden and Kuechel, 2004). Most current studies and even teacher workshops advocating video-making as an engaging learning activity for students in Singapore do not focus on assessment design of student-generated video projects.

Student-generated video projects can be considered an authentic assessment (also known as performance or alternative assessment), and includes a high degree of computer and film literacy that often consumes a lot of students’ time and energy. Assessment design is crucial in directing students’ efforts. It serves formative and summative assessment purposes and influences the extent of scaffolding teachers should provide for students while engaging them in deep learning (Chin and Brown, 2000).

Presenters
avatar for MADELINE CHEN

MADELINE CHEN

Assistant Head, NUS High School of Mathematics & Science
Geography, student generated video, collaboration, cooperative learning, research education, environmental education


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am GMT+08
MR 333 Suntec City Convention Hall

10:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 5/6: 474 Use Of Google Drive For The Support Of Patchwork Assessment In Lower Secondary Science
Limited Capacity seats available

“Everyone is a genius” a quote by Einstein. This applies best to our students in the normal stream. Through professional practice and experiences, we have observed that students’ performance in the normal stream differs that of express students. They  lack motivation and enthusiasm to excel in their studies. Thus we believed that the key to success lies in the mode of assessment.     

A pilot project was carried out for one secondary one Normal Technical class. The traditional pen-and-paper assessment was replaced with the use of Patchwork Assessment. However this does not suggest that Patchwork Assessment is a panacea for all the students' ills. The sole aim was to raise students’ self-efficacy and interest in science education and create an authentic curriculum that encourages active participation and learning.

Some of the key characteristics of the Patchwork Assessment are:


  1. Accommodate individual differences and multiple modes of representation in assessment;

  2. Allow students to receive feedback on their learning and the feedback received has 'social dimension';

  3. Provide students with opportunities to reflect on their learning.


The lower secondary science assessment weighs heavily on project-based assignments, self and peer reflection and the use of daily work in class.

The use of Google Drive was selected based on its user-friendly interface and the possibilities of adding on the various apps such as Popcorn Maker, ConceptBoard, Lucidchart and Mindmeister. This creates a coherent and systematic platform for greater feedback for learning. It also creates opportunities for students to share ideas and refine their projects for continuous learning. It also paves way for collaboration among students which will eventually leads to improvement in students’ learning outcomes.

A survey was also conducted for the students to better ascertain the benefits of Patchwork Assessment in the area of self-directed learning, engagement level and academic scores.

Presenters
BR

BEENA RAI

Bowen Secondary School
LJ

LIANG JIACHEN ADRIAN

Bowen Secondary
SH

SHAFIQAH HADAM

Bowen Secondary


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am GMT+08
MR 334

10:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 5/7: 499 10T’ Pedagogy; An Insight On Assessment For Learning And Providing Constructive Feedback In A Web Based Environment
Limited Capacity seats available

Assessment is definitely the heart of the whole teaching process. Educators and parents use assessment scores to gauge a pupil's academic performance. However, in recent years there has been a paradigm shift in assessing pupils learning outcomes and providing constructive feedback. The new assessment culture emphasizes “the importance of assessing students’ understanding rather than recall of factual knowledge” (Havnes & McDowell, 2008). In addition, educationalists believe that constructive feedback helps to regulate teaching so that the pace of moving towards a learning goal is adjusted to ensure the active participation of all pupils and support holistic education.

The 10’T programme in which Yishun Primary has embarked on is an alternative pedagogical design that leverages the use of ICT to promote learners’ interest in the Mother tongue language, and to improve on their language competencies in a web-based environment. This pedagogy has also allowed for the assessment for learning in pupils in an unthreatening environment; an environment where pupils are challenged and motivated to learn. It also allows for pupils to use the feedback provided in order to improve in their subsequent performance.

The 10’T lessons are conducted during the pupils’ curriculum time and all lessons have been designed based on the objectives stipulated in the curriculum to ensure complete coverage of the Tamil Language syllabus. During the curriculum time, pupils will be engaged in a wide range of web based extensive reading and writing activities. The reading activities are paced according to the pupils’ differentiated abilities. Pupils will be involved in self and peer assessments while embarking on their assignments. The portal also has functions that allow pupils to record their reading and choose to either send it to their teachers for assessment or even get feedback from their peers. This aural activity encourages learners to track their own progression and exceed their expected performance while inculcating the value of self-directed learning. It also allows for teachers and pupils to identify their learning gaps and improve on their learning through feedback.

The session will involve the sharing of the conceptualization of the teaching approach, which will include the philosophy, the background context and the motivation behind the programme. The presenters will share some of the successful lessons that were conducted. The presentation will also include the assessment and feedback processes and the impact on student learning together with the challenges faced by how these challenges were resolved.

Presenters
SR

SIVAKAMI RATHA

Ministry of Education
TV

THANDAVAMURTHY VASANTHAVELAN

Ministry of Education


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am GMT+08
MR 335

10:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 5/8: 401 Improving Students’ Writing Through An Experiential Learning Package Which Incorporates Self, Peer And Technology-Enhanced Feedback
Limited Capacity seats available

Students generally find it challenging to generate ideas in composition writing. This affects the content of their essays. They also do not receive sufficient feedback rapidly as it takes time for a teacher to complete marking the entire class’s work. Apart from the speed of the feedback received, students usually get feedback only from their teachers. Therefore there is currently little or no self or peer feedback given to students.

Henceforth this project involves the design and implementation of a framework centered on experiential learning together with self and peer feedback. The experiential learning, which is based on Kolb's learning cycle, will help the students to generate ideas for content. Thereafter students will be introduced to Automated Marking Tools that provide immediate and substantive feedback to address shortfalls in spelling, punctuation, basic grammar and sentence structure. Students will also engage in self and peer feedback using Making Thinking Visible (MTV) tools with specially designed checklists.

Despite the challenges faced, this approach successfully addressed the concerns in composition writing.

Presenters
AL

ANGELA LIM

Saint Andrew's Junior School
FI

FERNANDEZ IAN JOHN

St Andrew's Junior School
HS

HOE SHU CHEN

Saint Andrew's Junior School
JS

JENINE SOH

Saint Andrew's Junior School
LA

LUCY ANDREATTE LOH

Saint Andrew's Junior School
MO

MATTHEW ONG YONG CHENG

Saint Andrew's Junior School
NK

NORIMAH KAMARI

Saint Andrew's Junior School
NS

NORMAN SELVARAJU

Saint Andrew's Junior School


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am GMT+08
MR 336

10:30am GMT+08

Meet the Practitioners 4: Science Inquiry through Visualisation and Modelling
Limited Capacity seats available

Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am GMT+08
MR 332 Suntec City Convention Hall

10:30am GMT+08

Panel Discussion 2: Smart Nation - Impact and Implications on Education
Limited Capacity seats available

The Smart Nation initiative is Singapore government’s attempt to harness technology to improve the lives of citizens and to strengthen the community and society, enabled seamlessly and connected by technology. Already, technology is adopted across the consumer, enterprise and government segments in areas such as healthcare, transport and energy management, including education.

In a Smart Nation, beyond encouraging budding ICT enthusiasts and professionals to create and build technical capabilities through “tinkering with tech” and “making”, what are the impact and implications on education as a whole? What kind of students do we need to produce so that they are equipped and ready with the future skills required as we move forward in realizing the Smart Nation vision?

This panel comprises experts from various segments in sharing their views and perspectives.

Moderators
avatar for Rajesh Krishna Balan

Rajesh Krishna Balan

Director, LiveLabs Urban Lifestyle Innovation Platform, Singapore Management University
Prof. Balan is an Associate Professor of Information Systems at Singapore Management University's School of Information Systems. He obtained his Ph.D. in Computer Science in 2006 from Carnegie Mellon University and has over 15 years of research experience in the broad area of mobile... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lesly Goh

Lesly Goh

Director, Advanced Analytics Microsoft Asia Pacific
Ms Lesly Goh is the Director of Advanced Analytics based in Singapore.  Her focus is on converting data into actionable insights to enable business transformation and accelerate innovations.  For instance, Modern Workplace using organization analytics to drive business productivity... Read More →
avatar for Chan Lee Mun

Chan Lee Mun

Chief Skills Officer, Singapore Workforce Development Agency
As Principal & CEO of Nanyang Polytechnic (NYP), Mr Chan Lee Mun played a lead role in NYP’s development. He spearheaded initiatives to provide industry-relevant education and training programmes for students and working adults as well as to promote and strengthen partnership and... Read More →
avatar for Vance Ng

Vance Ng

Deputy Head, Smart Nation Programme Office


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am GMT+08
Hall 406D Suntec City Convention Hall

10:30am GMT+08

Spotlight 4: Devorah Heitner
Speakers
avatar for Devorah Heitner

Devorah Heitner

Founder, Raising Digital Natives
Devorah Heitner, PhD, Founder and CEO of Raising Digital Natives, is an experienced keynote speaker, workshop leader and consultant. She serves as a digital citizenship policy advisor to numerous public and independent schools. Dr. Heitner has spoken at Google Chicago, SXSWedu, TEDx, ISTE, the Family Online Safety Institute and The National Digital... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am GMT+08
Main Hall (404AX#,405BX - 406CX) Suntec City Convention Hall

11:00am GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Google for Education
Thursday March 31, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 6/1: 207 Game Creation As A Game Changer - Getting Our Students To Think Deeper And Wider
Limited Capacity seats available

In his paper, Video Games and The Future of Learning, David Shaffer, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at University of Wisconsin, mentioned that video games potentially serve as tremendous educational tools. In addition, according to a recent research, action-oriented video games may increase reading comprehension in children with dyslexia. With such studies showing the benefits of game playing, what about game making? Does it have a more important place and purpose in schools?

Wellington has been teaching students how to create computer games since 2006. What started out as a project for the InfoComm Club, it grew from a school wide level, cluster and eventually a national event. This year was the biggest participation ever with over 80 teams joining in the game creation event codenamed the National Primary Games Creation Competition or more fondly known as NPGCC. But what drives the school and the ICT department to continue to pursue, extend and expand on this initiative?

The biggest change seen in students undergoing the school’s computer game creation programme was in the way students think and solve problems. It is mainly because of this outcome of students having a better and clearer thought process that led to the growth and popularity of NPGCC. Students that experienced the nine month long journey in creating their games as a team learnt planning and problem-solving. Teams planned their games that require players to search, negotiate, plan various approaches in order to advance to a new level and implement strategies. The process of understanding game rules and learning by doing provides children with essential decision-making skills. And that is only half of the story!

Participants will be invited on a journey with Wellington to see how far the school has gone since the inception of the game creation initiative. See how the school utilized opportunities from that one simple initiative to encompass InterDisciplinary Project Work, Applied Learning Programme and Coding. More importantly, the possibility for growth in the future and opportunity for collaboration amongst all schools will be offered during the presentation.

As the world continues to change in how we communicate, shop and entertain, schools must benefit from exploring the growing world of computer games creation, which we firmly believe will serve a variety of children's emotional, social and intellectual needs. Do come for an honest, interesting and light hearted session on the important growth of our students.



Presenters
avatar for Mr. Roslee bin Jalie

Mr. Roslee bin Jalie

HOD ICT, WELLINGTON PRIMARY SCHOOL
Roslee Bin Jalie is the HOD ICT of Wellington Primary School and has been teaching for twenty years. His work in the area of Flipped Classroom started in early 2012 but he has gone on to share on various local and international platform. He uses a variety of tools along such as the... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 327

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 6/2: 244 Leading Innovation And Excellence @ NSPS: Enhanced Professional Development Of ICT Mentors
Limited Capacity seats available

In this 21st century, digital learners are well-equipped with basic knowledge in navigating the cyber world. Educators play an important role in facilitating students in their learning. With innovative lessons that are designed to leverage on ICT affordances, teachers engage these new-age learners when delivering these ICT-enriched lessons. Such learning experiences and exposure put our students in good stead for the ICT challenges of tomorrow.

At iCTLT 2014, North Spring Primary School shared with fellow educators on 'ICT Mentoring Programme @ NSPS: A Multiplier-Effect Approach'. Sustainability and scalability of this unique approach is key in leading our school into the next phase of professional development.

With knowledge of TPACK at our fingertips, ICT mentors and mentees in our school have progressed to tap on ICT affordances to transform the learning environment. The planning of lesson studies, modular programmes and holistic assessment inspire our teachers to continuously research into ICT-enabled learning and practices. With customized and professional learning time dedicated to the discussion of student-centric learning and integration of ICT in curriculum and assessment, self-directed learning (SDL) and collaborative learning (CoL) have flourished. As champions of effective use of technology in teaching and learning, ICT mentors lead in the exploration of ICT approaches and tools across all subject areas. Across all levels in the school, teachers pilot the use of age-appropriate ICT affordances in enhancing students' learning experiences. With theory and practice in place, teachers’ confidence and competencies have reached greater heights. In addition, qualitative and quantitative data are gathered and assessment for learning allow teachers to better understand their students’ learning needs and improve on pedagogies.

The school's culture of innovation and excellence is exemplified through teachers' unwavering determination in integrating various ICT affordances to create a wholesome learning environment. The sharing culture also encourages teachers to learn from one another as they fine-tune lessons and continually find ways to enhance ICT-enriched lessons in a bid to meet students’ needs. In line with this integration, ICT is also infused across departments in terms of programmes. Partnership with stakeholders also plays an important role in the extension of learning beyond school. At this sharing, North Spring Primary School aims to share how the pervasive use of ICT in school is supported and sustained.

Presenters
GP

GOH POH KHIM

North Spring Primary
JK

JACKSON KEK

HOD, ICT, North Spring Primary School
SM

SHARIFAH MARIAM

North Spring Primary


Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 328

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 6/3: 322 Dot’s English Expedition: English Language Grammar and Vocabulary Game
Limited Capacity seats available

Current practice has teachers using direct instruction and drill and practice to teach grammar, and students generally find this a tedious and boring process. Gamification is the use of elements of game design in non-game contexts, and the process is thought to encourage participation and increase engagement. It can be argued that students can enjoy learning more through them as they are familiar with such platforms and formats. In this study, we examined the impact of the app on the interest of students in learning grammar and the level of participation in the app. To observe students’ behaviour pertaining to their level of participation and interest, a checklist was created. Data was collected and analysed to find out whether there was an increase in student engagement in learning English grammar as they played the game. The findings show that there has been both an increase in interest and the level of participation amongst the students. 

It is expected that a greater rate of participation and interest would, in the long run, enable students to score better in Paper 1 Section A (Editing).

Presenters
KW

KWANG WAN YI

St Margaret's Secondary


Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 329

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 6/4: 481 Enabling Deeper Learning: Developing Adaptive, Self-Correcting Learning Environments With Google Forms & Sites
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

The ground-breaking ideas of Vygotsky and Krashen - of proximal development and i+1 -  make intuitive sense, but have always been a challenge to adequately implement in class. More recently, research has consistently shown the value of flexible and adaptive work and learning environments. But teachers know that it is difficult to create deep learning environments, and there is no room for adaptation in assessment.

Or is there?

In the days of flipped classrooms and student-driven learning, we need to change from traditional output-focused methods such as worksheets. Here, the opportunity window for teachers to adapt to individual learners is small, and after-the-fact corrections are ineffective.

Yet there is huge potential in this mode of work, which can be tapped with adaptive web forms that redirect learners upon provision of different answers. We have been experimenting with ways of enriching these traditional approaches with methods to help us identify and cater to proximal development moments as they occur for our learners.

The method we have settled on is Google Sites and Forms, varying with conditional answers. Questions can be multimedia and multimodal, and are extremely flexible. If the student gives the intended response, they move to the next question. If not, we have identified a developmental gap. The learner moves to a simplified question, which often includes a small revision of the key concepts (often a mini video lesson) before they attempt to answer again. All responses are captured for each learner in a spread sheet, and are available for fine-grained data analysis.

This method allows us to make homework and assessments teachable moments, while giving us a great deal of information. We have full access to truly formative data, allowing us to easily group, regroup and mix up our classes, which shows us which skills and knowledge items are present or absent in classes and individual students.

We use free software that does not have a high barrier to entry, allowing our teachers and learners to participate in the content creation. The learner as end user is often in their zone of proximal development, and the data that is available to the teacher is extensive and invaluable - and our school has come to depend heavily on it.

This method is readily implemented in any school and subject, and deepens the learning experience of all.



Presenters
DB

DAVID BROWN

EDB Hong Kong


Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 330

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 6/5: 507 Empowering Teachers And Engaging Students Through Game-Based Learning Platform
Limited Capacity seats available

The learning of theory in Computer Applications (CPA) poses a great challenge to many Normal Technical students. The students generally find it an insurmountable task to memorise definitions, facts and terminologies in the subject. This results in teachers facing difficulties in engaging and motivating students in the learning of theory in CPA. The pedagogical approach to engage students in the learning of theory in CPA is through the use of a game-based learning website called Zondle.

The main feature of this website uses games to support learning. Teachers created questions for learners to answer, providing them with a myriad of games to play if the answers are correct. Each correct answer earns them points which can be converted to Zollars. Teachers make use of the Zollars Leader Board to update students of their progress. Another feature, Zondle Challenge, is an interactive quiz which allows students to participate together as a class. This requires all students to respond to each question within a given time limit via their mobile phones, tablets or laptops. After all students had submitted their responses, the teacher will reveal and discuss the answer of each question with the students. The overall ranking of results will be shown to the students at the end of the quiz.

Through Zondle, the teachers are empowered to create and share content to meet the specific learning needs of individual students. The students no longer feel the stress of learning theory in CPA, as they get to learn theory and play games at the same time. Teachers in turn use extrinsic motivation by rewarding the students based on their Zollars earned to influence the students to work harder.  Results collated across all levels show that students’ retention of computer knowledge related to the syllabus has improved tremendously after lessons using Zondle games are implemented.

Presenters
BT

BRIAN TAN SI HAO

Bedok North Secondary School
LC

LAM CHEN PENG

Bedok North Secondary School
LH

LAU HUI CHENG

Bedok North Secondary School
avatar for NG TZE FENG

NG TZE FENG

Bedok North Secondary
TP

TAN POO HONG

Bedok North Secondary


Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 333 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 6/6: 553 Optimizing Mother Tongue Language Learning Using The Web-Based iMTL Interactive Portal
Limited Capacity seats available

Oral presentation is important in day-to-day communication and is part of summative assessment in schools. Students taking Chinese language face difficulties in developing oral descriptive narratives in a coherent and organized manner and tend to omit details. Oral practices are often conducted in traditional classroom setting, involving rote-learning that is teacher-centred. Students do not have sufficient opportunity to practise their oral skills. Weaker students who have other concerns such as lack of self-confidence may be neglected in the classrooms.

Launched in 2013 by the Ministry of Education, the iMTL Interactive Portal leverages on the info-communication technology and aims to strengthen students’ language skills through the use of authentic language tasks. The purpose of this lesson study was to resolve pedagogical issues that are experienced in conventional classroom teaching. The two-cycle lesson study was started in 2014 with two Primary Five medium-ability classes in Lakeside Primary School. This lesson study explored the use of the web-based iMTL Interactive Portal and its effectiveness in optimising students’ learning. A learner-centred pedagogy is adopted to encourage self-directed and collaborative learning, giving every student the opportunity to express himself. Individual student can develop his personal oral skills at his own pace. The lesson study revealed that Components such as consideration of the students’ readiness, questioning techniques, design of scaffolding instruction, selection of topic and stimulus, choice of collaborative mode, and grouping of students, are important in optimising the effective use of the iMTL Interactive Portal.

Classroom observations, focus group interviews and surveys revealed that students were positive about the use of the ICT tool, and they benefited from peer-to-peer learning. The weaker students modelled after their peers in developing their own speech, while the stronger students would help to correct their peers before and during recording. The selected video was related to the students’ real experiences and this motivated them to learn. Peer evaluation encouraged a two-way learning process, whereby students learn from others and develop their self-reflection skills.

The lesson study encountered various challenges at the different stages: from the development of the lesson plan to the delivery of the lesson. Main challenges included adjustments to the conventional pedagogical beliefs, such as shifting from teacher-centric to student-centric learning, and the role of the teacher. This, in turn, affected the design and delivery of the lessons, and management of time as well as technical glitches.

Presenters
CP

CHUA POH LAM

Lakeside Primary School
LC

LOH CHIOW CHIEN

Teacher, Lakeside Primary School
MS

MA SHAOWEN

Lakeside Primary School


Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 334

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 6/7: 536 Creating 21st Century Learning Experiences For 21st Century
Limited Capacity seats available

Online learning systems are potentially powerful platforms to deliver effective ICT-based lessons for students. While there are many existing ‘learning management systems’, these systems are often massive collections of tools that aim to do everything, but often end up doing nothing particularly proficiently.

Teachers at Crescent Girls’ School have created Spectrum – a rapid learning content creator that allows teachers to rapidly create and deploy bite-size, impactful ‘learning experiences’ within minutes on web and mobile platforms. Spectrum enables deep learning in students, and is yet so straightforward and engaging to use by both students and teachers, that it can be used pervasively across subjects and consistently over time.

Carefully curated features within these ‘learning experiences’ such as the ability to support multi-modal resources, rapid-marking and time-based deployment functions allow teachers to deliver lessons using multiple pedagogies such as flipped learning and inquiry-based learning. Designed with the learner in mind, learning experiences in Spectrum also have gamification features such as points tracking, virtual awards and leaderboards that motivates learners to strive for better scores.

A further unique feature of Spectrum is the 21st Century Competencies Assessment Module. Based on a set of 21CC Student Assessment rubrics co-created by Crescent Girls’ School and Stanford Research Institute International (SRI International), this module empowers teachers to score and track their students’ attainment of competencies such as ‘collaboration’, ‘knowledge construction’, ‘global awareness’, ‘real-world problem solving’ etc. This powerful feature allows lessons designed using the school’s ‘21st Century Learning Design’ (21CLD) framework to be assessed for the purpose of providing clear and timely feedback to students to aid in their learning. 

When used across different subjects over time, Spectrum turns into a rich data mine containing records of students’ responses and score attainment, allowing the progress of each student to be tracked for assessment and developmental purposes.

In this workshop, participants will experience the simplicity and capability of Spectrum first-hand as both students and teachers through a lesson demonstration. They will also work with other participants to design bite-size learning experiences and discover their potential as building blocks of rich 21st Century learning in students. 

Presenters
LB

LEE BOON KENG

Crescent Girls' School
RK

RICHARD KOH PEE CHOU

richard_koh@crescent.edu.sg, Crescent Girls' School


Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 335

11:30am GMT+08

Paper Presentation 6/8: 537 Collaborative Science Inquiry For Visible Teaching And Learning Of Chemistry Concepts
Limited Capacity seats available

High school chemistry students find learning of chemistry concepts, especially abstract chemical phenomena, challenging. Students have to process new information and understandings in descriptive form and to relate them to sub-microscopic understandings while using a range of symbolisms to represent what they understood.

This paper describes how Collaborative Science Inquiry (CSI) facilitated by technology is used to deliver a systematic approach to teach and learn the concept of of acid strength in organic chemistry. Students are empowered to visualise concepts and construct conceptual knowledge to deepen their learning. 

A CSI teaching and learning platform based on model-based guided scientific inquiry was co-designed in collaboration with Technologies for Learning Branch, Educational Technologies Division (ETD), Ministry of Education, Singapore. ICT tools such as Google site with a suite of web 2.0 tools are harnessed to create a constructivist learning environment. The 5E approach (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) is used to guide a sequence of learner-centred activities to develop the concept of acid strength using collaborative working spaces, core thinking routines and multimedia artefacts.

The CSI learning environment is versatile enough to support a variety of teaching strategies and learning experiences for both self-directed learners and collaborative learners with teacher facilitation.

Preliminary observations showed that the questioning pedagogy and core thinking routines were effective in raising students’ curiosity and motivating students’ questioning to resolve misconceptions and to extend learning. Students became active learners, engaging in dialogic classroom discourse with their peers and teacher. This made both the teacher’s thinking and students’ thinking observable. Questions asked by students provided the teacher with feedback and insights into students' thinking and conceptual understanding. Analysis of both formative assessment and summative assessment data also indicated positive impact on students’ learning outcomes.

Participants would benefit from the sharing of the collaboration experience with ETD officers, and the key pedagogical and technological considerations in the customisation of CSI to deepen subject mastery and to develop 21st century competencies.

The sharing also aims to increase understanding of the role of teacher as a designer of learning experiences and environments and how the practice of CSI enhances teaching practice and development of pedagogical-content knowledge.

Findings from this pilot study would be discussed with recommendations for incorporation of more interactive web 2.0 tools, improvement of CSI implementation process, development of teacher facilitation skills and enhancement of students’ group processes for collaborative learning.



Presenters
EG

ELEANOR GOH

Pioneer Junior College
avatar for POH MENG LENG

POH MENG LENG

HOD ICT, Yishun Secondary School
Interested in dabbling in ICT tools in T&L.


Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT+08
MR 336

11:30am GMT+08

HOD ICT Track with Mark Pegrum
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Mark Pegrum

Mark Pegrum

Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Western Australia
Mark Pegrum is an associate professor in the Faculty of Education at The University of Western Australia, where he specialises in mobile learning and, more broadly, e-learning. His teaching has been recognised through Faculty and University Excellence in Teaching Awards, as well as... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm GMT+08
Hall 406D Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Meet the Practitioners 5: Exploring ICT in Problem Based Learning for Chinese Language
Limited Capacity seats available

Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 332 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Model Lesson 7: 323 Enhancing Learning Journeys with Location-Based Mobile Interactive Heritage Trails (iHTs) to Little India
Limited Capacity seats available

ICT infusion into learning journeys through the use of smart phone technology and broadband networks has helped to enhance students’ learning of the humanities in Learning Journeys. Supported by location-based mobile technology using Global Positioning System (GPS), Image recognition and Bluetooth Beacon Technology, students can benefit from authentic learning when educational content is effectively rendered on the mobile handsets at pre-determined location-of-interest.


In addition, CHIJ (Katong) Primary has observed that schools had embarked on mobile learning trails to engage their students. As such, the school assessed that mobile learning trails could be harnessed to engage their students. Taking a smaller student group to facilitator ratio approach, the trail would allow students to collaborate and learn more from each other. Bearing these in mind, CHIJ (Katong) Primary embarked on engaging LDR run CHIJ’s first mobile learning trail, the interactive Heritage trails (iHTs) to Little India. CHIJ (Katong) Primary chose the Little India Heritage trail as it was in alignment with the Social Studies lessons and the prescribed workbook activities.

With students learning timely content onsite, and at their own pace, the iHT is a platform to afford the drive towards promoting self-directed learning in the students. The contents provided include information (facts, images and videos), questions and mobile games like word puzzles. The mobile platform allows the teachers to track and analyse the students’ learning through the students’ answers to the online quizzes.

On top of the learning afforded by iHTs, CHIJ (Katong) Primary linked the mobile learning experiences with the activity in the 5B Activity Book which required the students to design an outfit based on what they have learnt. Students were given more information in order to help them complete the activities in the workbook.

moderator: Hairul Bariyah Bte Maksom 

Presenters
EL

ER LI LI

CHIJ Katong Primary
MR

MAHENDRAN RUDRARANI

CHIJ Katong Primary School
PB

PNG BEE HIN

LDR Pte. Ltd



Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 308 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Model Lesson 8: 519 Kahoot! An Engaging Approach to Flip the Class
Limited Capacity seats available

Motivation for Approach

Students sitting listlessly and inattentively whenever a teacher starts teaching are all too familiar and are an inherent challenge for many educators. Similarly, when students are told to prepare for the lesson beforehand, many come to class unprepared. As such, it is back to the use of didactic teaching which may not inspire nor engage students.

Pedagogical Approaches

With CLLIPS and ACoLADE as a basis for instructional planning and classroom teaching, the project team adopt a combination of flipped learning and structural gamification using an online quiz.

Flipped learning is a pedagogical model that supports Guiding Discovery where the usual lecture and homework elements of a lesson are reversed. Instead of listening to the teacher in class and then doing homework, students would view learning materials such as videos or online articles independently by themselves before lesson. The teacher would then use Kahoot, an online gamification platform as an Assessment for Learning tool (AFL) to check for understanding and provide explicit explanation and instructions to clarify doubts and check for understanding of concepts.

Technology and Its Rationale for Use

Using Kahoot! to complement Flipped Learning works well because learners are now more motivated to prepare for the lesson in order to win the ‘game’. This element of fun and competition is appealing to them.

Kahoot! also allows teachers to create quizzes as an AFL tool, which could reflect students’ understanding for a topic. Teachers could also address misconceptions immediately. This could be done as it gives control to the teacher to pause the quiz after each question. Such flexibility provides real-time feedback to both students and teacher since the results of each question could be captured and shared with students.

Impact on Teaching and Learning

This approach provides the opportunity for active learning and student engagement; it also encourages Self-directed Learning and possible collaboration among the learners.

In addition, it frees up classroom time where students could use the time more constructively in clarifying doubts.

This workshop would take participants through the pedagogy of flipped learning and design of quizzes on Kahoot!. Participants would also have a hands-on game session and see for themselves the dynamism and the level of engagement that their learners would experience.


Presenters
MM

MODISSA MOK YIK TUNG

Maris Stella High (Secondary)
avatar for WINDRAN NEO LAY TENG

WINDRAN NEO LAY TENG

ICT Mentor, Maris Stella High School



Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 309 Suntec City Convention Hall

11:30am GMT+08

Closed Door Session for School Leaders with Michael Fullan
Limited Capacity seats available

Closed Door Session for School Leaders with Michael Fullan

Speakers
avatar for Michael Fullan

Michael Fullan

Professor Emeritus, Education in Motion
Michael Fullan, OC, is the former Dean of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. Recognized as a worldwide authority on educational reform, he advises policymakers and local leaders around the world in helping to achieve the moral purpose of all... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 331 Suntec City Convention Hall

12:00pm GMT+08

Up Close 3: Diana Laurillard
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Diana Laurillard

Diana Laurillard

Professor of Learning with Digital Technologies, Department of Culture, Communication and Media, London Knowledge Lab
Diana Laurillard is Professor of Learning with Digital Technologies at the London Knowledge Lab, UCL Institute of Education where she leads research projects on developing a learning design support environment for teachers, the Design of MOOCs for professional development and research... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT+08
MR 310 Suntec City Convention Hall

12:00pm GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Integral Solutions (Asia) Pte Ltd
Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

12:30pm GMT+08

Lunch Break
Thursday March 31, 2016 12:30pm - 2:00pm GMT+08
Hall 401 & Hall 402

1:00pm GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Lego Education
Thursday March 31, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

2:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 7/1: 326 Integrating Learning Technologies In School; A School-Wide Approach To Flipped Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

Rosyth has embarked on a school-wide flipped classroom approach since June 2014. In the flipped classroom model, students learn content online at home and are engaged in discussions on concepts and in solving questions together in class. Teacher interaction with students is more personalised and closer guidance can be provided as less time is spent on content delivery.

The flipped classroom approach to teaching has been well-received by the teachers, students and parents alike. Teachers noticed that students raised a lot more questions during lessons as they work on their classroom activities. Students were fully engaged as there were more hands-on learning opportunities available in class. Parents welcomed the flipped lessons as their children could view the online content at their own pace at home and many even used them for revision just before the termly examinations. Parents also felt that with the flipped lessons, they were able to gain further insight into lessons learnt in school and could also guide their children better when they had queries.

During the session, the team, including the school leader will be sharing on change management, the challenges faced and their experiences during the implementation. Through this sharing, the presenters hope that school leaders and educators can take away some methods and approaches to effectively and seamlessly integrate learning technologies in their schools.


Presenters
CN

CELINE NG

Rosyth School
CA

CHEW ANSHENG VICTOR

Rosyth School
KM

KOH MUI LEE EVELYN

Rosyth School


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm GMT+08
MR 310 Suntec City Convention Hall

2:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 7/2: 604 Blended Flipped Classroom: Integrating ICT And Didactic Approaches To Build Independent Learners In Science
Limited Capacity seats available

The flipped classroom approach has gained much traction in recent years among international educators. The flipped classroom approach aims to develop student’s competencies in allowing them to take ownership of their learning. Flipping the classroom establishes a framework that ensures students receive a personalised education which is tailored to their individual needs. (Bergman & Sams, 2012; Keengwe, 2014)

Many Singaporean teachers however, generally found that the adoption of the flipped approach was not the most efficient way to teach, even though most agreed that it promised deep and effective learning among students. This is further compounded by the constraints of a national syllabus and standardised national examinations that give teachers little luxury of time to embark and explore this approach.

The employment of the blended flipped classroom entails the incorporation of certain but not all elements from the traditional flipped classroom, together with any other feasible pedagogical strategies, that may include certain teacher-facilitated and didactic approaches, so that the national syllabus can still be completed on time and yet still bring about desired outcomes in students with respect to independent and student-directed learning.

In this blended approach, Web 2.0 tools (eg. Weebly and Kahoots), other collaborative ICT tools (eg. TodaysMeet and Prezi) are married with traditional pen-and-paper methods to ensure that students had easy-to-navigate platforms for self-directed learning, student-led discussions and for the assessment of their learning.

Students in the blended flipped classroom are able to toggle effectively between technology-based methods and didactic methods, either working independently or collaboratively during project work, to achieve the learning outcomes.

Through this approach, students were observed to learn independently, within and beyond the scope of the syllabus. They were also observed to be more curious, interested and motivated in the subject. Teachers also expressed that they had more time to work on common misconceptions with students and address areas of concern more specifically as the students came to class prepared and were able to articulate clearly what they did not know or what they wanted to know.

In this presentation, we will walk delegates through some of the strategies, online and offline that students have themselves gone through. Some of the challenges that the teachers have faced during the initial stages of implementation and plans moving forward will also be shared so that participants can customise and develop their own brand of a flipped approach that works for their unique learners or environment.

Presenters
avatar for KONG WAI FUN JACKLYN

KONG WAI FUN JACKLYN

Subject Head ICT, Junyuan Secondary
I believe in the inclusion of educational technology for meaningful engagement of students for T&L. If you've got novel and effective ideas, pray share!
TH

TAY HUI MIN

Junyuan Secondary School
VM

VANESSA MUHUNDAN

Junyuan Secondary School


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm GMT+08
MR 327

2:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 7/3: 412 Use Of Pedagogy-Driven Technology In Language And Science
Limited Capacity seats available

Every school a good school - Our goal in education is to provide an opportunity to develop each child holistically to maximise his potential. At Shuqun Secondary School, we continuously explored various means to actively engage our students by addressing the learning gaps backed by a keen understanding of the learning profile of learners and their learning needs.

The Professional Learning Communities(PLC) at our school focus on improving the teaching and learning(T&L) to support the Whole School Curriculum(WSC) . Through structured PLC sessions, teachers engage in an ongoing cycle of sharing expertise, discussing ideas and working collaboratively that promotes deep team learning, improve teaching skills and student outcomes. The four strands of PLC are:

•        Formative Assessment - Making Thinking Visible

•        STEM (Skilful Teacher and Enhanced Mentoring)

•        SPARCS (Shuqun Personalized and Asynchronous Curriculum for Collaboration and Self-directed learning)

•        Tutorial Relationships

The PLCs help to stretch teacher thinking on how to improve T&L outcomes both quantitatively and qualitatively by exploring what is possible with the maturation of ICT affordances and ICT-infused learning environments.

The projects described in this proposal are a result of drawing various learnings from the different PLC strands by capitalising the widely ICT-enabled learning environment  in the school. Both projects sought to actively engage students in their learning through personalising instructions and partnering pedagogy using technological tools.

The Chinese teachers drew from Formative Assessment and STEM strands and the ICT tool Padlet, to design lessons based on Making Thinking Visible Using Padlet. Thinking routines are phrased as questions and posed on Padlet to draw ideas and responses from students. With teachers serving as facilitators in discussion, students exhibited drive and self-regulatory dispositions to manage flow and development of ideas. They also  demonstrated  agency when trying to socially resolve cognitive dissonances occurring from diverse ideas. 

In the science project based on SPARCS, the teachers explored and reflected on their journey in the second year of practising the flipped classroom. The focus of the classroom experiences shifted from monitoring students' viewing of videos and completion of exercises in the classroom to exploring how learning could be more personalised and how ownership of learning could be transferred to the learner through partnership in the classroom.

The presentation seeks to show how teachers, faced with a myriad of choices from ICT tools to various T&L strategies, are able to explore various means and transform the interactions with their students.

Presenters
TK

TAN KOK BOON

Shuqun Secondary
TQ

TEO QIN YI

Shu Qun Secondary
YA

YEO AIK SER

Shuqun Secondary School
ZL

ZANE LIM KIM YEN

Shuqun Secondary School


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm GMT+08
MR 328

2:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 7/4: 468 Use Of Visualisation Analytics Data To Redesign And Enhance Students’ Learning Experiences
Limited Capacity seats available

Data analytics has been recognized as a means to identify at-risk learners to provide interventions and informs teachers on the learning of students so as to improve the design of learning experiences (Johnson et al., 2011). However, the potential impact in the use of data for teaching and learning has not been sufficiently explored in the Singapore school contexts due to challenges and constraints involved in utilising large data analyses for effective interventions in the classroom. This paper thus aimed to examine the role of learning analytics in enhancing students’ learning of Science in Singapore schools. 

As part of a study that involves partnership with Ministry of Education - Educational Technology Division and Information Technology Branch, pilot schools were provided with training and access to TokTol (a Science-based learning system with built-in learning analytics tool). Teachers integrated the use of Toktol into their teaching and made use of the data generated on students’ learning to guide their lesson design and implementation. Here, a case study is used to illustrate the use of data to redesign learning experiences of the students for a Physics topic in a secondary school context. The class report provided a snapshot of students’ learning in the form of “visual heat maps” which allows assessment of students’ learning. Information on weak students and science concepts that students struggled with were analysed. Through a differentiated instruction approach, the students were grouped based on ability to collaborate on learning tasks of varying difficulty levels. This facilitated the mastery of the concepts in the cognitively stronger students and improving the conceptual understanding of the weaker ones. The tasks also provided students with opportunities to collaborate together on authentic problems and made their thought processes visible through co-created solutions which assessed students formatively. Through group presentations, students reflected on the feasibility of their solutions. The students consolidated and extended their own learning by thinking deeper into the various contexts which the concepts were applied. 

Initial findings demonstrated that the data derived from TokTol also strengthened the teacher’s capacity to identify students’ learning needs and intervention strategies that support students’ learning. The authors will be analysing students’ responses at summative assessment on the same topic to determine further impact on students’ outcomes. It is recommended that that studies could be conducted to clarify the value of adaptive learning for both the learner and teacher as an approach to personalise learning experiences.

Presenters
BS

BERNARD SIT

Senior Applications Consultant, Ministry of Education, Information Technology Branch
CW

CHEN WEIGUO JEREMY

Chong Boon Secondary School
FS

FOO SEAU YOON

Ministry of Education
MB

MOK BOON FOONG

HOD ITMRL, MOE / Chong Boon Secondary School
avatar for POH MENG LENG

POH MENG LENG

HOD ICT, Yishun Secondary School
Interested in dabbling in ICT tools in T&L.


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm GMT+08
MR 329

2:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 7/5: 624 Assessment For Learning In English Process Writing With Automated Marking Tool (AMT)
Limited Capacity seats available

Process Writing involves a recursive cycle of: writing, receiving feedback, and revising. One crucial component in this process is the timely feedback provided to the students (MOE/ETD, 2013). Given the importance of effective communication via writing and to be successful in the 21st century, it is important to understand how young children make use of computer-assisted technology (Vickers, 2008) and peer feedback (Liu & Lin, 2007) to enhance their writing through reducing surface-level errors in English Language classrooms.

Automated Essay Scoring (AES) is defined as the computer technology that evaluates and scores the written prose (Shermis & et. al., 2002-2003; in Dikli, 2006) based on analytical algorithms. AES engines, such as premium commercial programs CriterionSM from ETS and WriteToLearn from Pearson Knowledge Technologies, are used for formative assessment purposes where students can submit various drafts of their writing to be scored, and then use choose to incorporate the feedback into the next draft of the writing (Phillips, 2007). However, such constructive feedback can also be provided with teacher intervention in a mediated situation.

This presentation aims to share with the participants about school-based study findings on the impact of peer feedback with the use of freemium Automated Marking Tools (AMTs) such as Ginger software for a class of Primary Four students on their grammatical accuracy in word and phrase levels, as part of the English Language (EL) Writing Process Cycle (WPC) over a STELLAR unit.

To overcome time constraints for teachers to address the need to give quick yet extensive feedback to a language class of 40 students, Ginger software can complement teachers’ instruction by providing diagnostic feedback on basic language conventions (e.g. grammar, spelling, punctuation) for the budding writers. Hence, the students will be able to review, revise, proofread and edit to improve writing and representation by proofreading and editing drafts (e.g. through class-editing, peer-editing) independently. They are able to express in writing the knowledge of grammatical rules at word and phrase levels when they explain their rationale of accepting the corrected sentences by AMT.

SDL: Students take ownership of their learning by articulating their learning gaps; and management and monitoring of their own learning by reflecting and using peer feedback to improve their writing.

CoL: Students employ effective group processes by interactively contributing own ideas clearly and considering other points of view objectively and maturely; and asking questions to clarify and offering constructive feedback to peers.



Moderators
avatar for ELAINE JEE

ELAINE JEE

Senior Educational Technology Officer, Ministry of Education
Elaine conducts classroom research on implementation principles for sustainable and scalable applications of ICT for enriched learning experiences. She has shared her findings at various international conferences. Elaine also promotes a culture of active experimentation and reflective... Read More →

Presenters
CS

CHIN SAU LAI

Princess Elizabeth Primary School
DC

DAPHNE CHAN PEI SZE

HOD - ICT/MRL, Princess Elizabeth Primary
GT

GENEVIEVE TOH

Princess Elizabeth Primary School
NB

NOORHIRDAWATI BUANG

Princess Elizabeth Primary


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm GMT+08
MR 330

2:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 7/6: 363 Professional Development And Culture Building Of Staff In Use Of Technology
Limited Capacity seats available

A recent report released by OECD on 15 September, 2015 highlighted that students from countries that performed well in PISA actually had gone through a lower rate of ICT use compared to students from countries who had experienced a higher rate of ICT use.

So, is it true that computers are irrelevant to students’ performance?  Are the efforts and investments of Singapore’s ICT MasterPlans 1 to 3 ineffectual? Based on the report, it suggested that while technology can amplify great teaching, great technology cannot replace poor teaching. Hence, teachers' competency matters.

Methodist Girls’ School (MGS) shares the same belief that only good teachers can enable students to perform well and technology multiplies that effect.  In a recent experience in their 1:1 Computing, MGS was mindful not to make technology the main focus in its planning and implementation.  MGS felt that it was more important to address issues on how technology is used by teachers and how teachers are developed.  Hence, most of its efforts were concentrated on teacher training and culture building.

In this paper, MGS hopes to share a case study of its recent experience in promoting the use of technology and the professional development of its teachers and staff.  The introduction of some key initiatives such as 1:1 Computing programme and the positioning of professional Learning Communities (PLC) enhanced the staff culture and advanced the use of ICT to enable effective teaching, more engaged learning and raising overall productivity.  Learning and interactions are now richer on the staff to staff level and also that of teacher to student.  Feedback from students and teachers are very positive.

In this sharing, MGS will highlight how TPACK and SAMR models have guided the school’s approach in driving professional development.  The school will also share how the UNESCO ICT Competency Framework for Teachers helped frame the teachers’ competency continuum.

Presenters
avatar for LAU CHEE KEEN

LAU CHEE KEEN

METHODIST GIRLS' SCHOOL
avatar for Mr. David Loh Jee Yong

Mr. David Loh Jee Yong

Senior Teacher, METHODIST GIRLS' SCHOOL (SECONDARY)
Mr. David Loh is currently a Senior Teacher at Methodist Girls’ School, Singapore. He has more than 19 years’ experience teaching Chemistry at Secondary level and was Subject Head for Chemistry from 2007 to 2011. An advocate of the use of technology in education, he believes... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm GMT+08
MR 333 Suntec City Convention Hall

2:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 7/7: 512 A Holistic Approach To Cyber Wellness Education At Pre-University Level
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation builds on MOE’s sharing (“Developing Student Leadership in Cyber Wellness Through Peer Advocacy Approach”) on their promotion of the peer advocacy approach for cyber wellness education amongst students in Singapore schools. It will focus on sharing Innova Junior College’s own experience in developing a comprehensive Cyber Wellness education programme at the Pre-University level utilising a “for students, by students” approach.

Since 2012, this peer advocacy approach has been developed through the engagement of student advocates in a wide range of internal and external events and activities of varying complexity, from the delivery of lessons to the conceptualisation of campaigns and learning resources. While some aspects of the programme remain teacher-driven, the main thrust of the college’s Cyber Wellness initiatives is now focused upon student-led approaches – ranging from student-led lessons to student-designed school campaigns and also student-led national Cyber Wellness conferences.  The collaborations with partners such as MOE and MDA/MLC also provided useful insights on cyber wellness and media literacy issues.

The key advantage of partnering students in cyber wellness education is the age-appropriate insights and experiences they bring into the discussions and learning resources. Feedback gathered over the years suggest that these student-led initiatives are consistently well-received, with high numbers (over 90%) of students polled finding the issues covered, relevant to their current day context.  Over 90% of students also liked the idea of having their peers conduct such lessons and/or running such events. For instance, participants shared that student-led lessons were a good idea as it was “very entertaining” and the fact that his/her peers were conducting the lesson “really captured the audience’s attention.”

Overall, this presentation hopes to share with participants the college’s experience in developing Cyber Wellness student ambassadors and working with them and external partners for a range of digital citizenship learning experiences. It will be closely aligned to one of the strands of iCTLT 2016: Inspiring Deep Learning with ICT in Curriculum, Assessment and Pedagogy, and is underpinned by the belief that a bottom-up (rather than top-down) approach could allow students more ownership and is more effective for cultivating core values in our students. Through this, it hopes to highlight the increasing need to move beyond just academics to ensure that our young can navigate this new digital age adroitly with respect, decency and a sense of civic responsibility.

Presenters
JG

JASPER GOH HAN MING

Innova Junior College
RL

RENDY LIWANG

Innova Junior College
WM

WONG MIN YIN

School of Science and Technology, Singapore


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm GMT+08
MR 334

2:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 7/8: 561 ICT-Enhanced Active Collaborative Learning Of Entrepreneurship Using Computer Simulation Game And Online Tool
Limited Capacity seats available

A key emphasis of polytechnic education in Singapore is the development deep skills and mastery through applied learning in the application of technical and soft skills in a real-world environment. Learning can be enhanced and even accelerated with the use of ICT technology, especially for occasions when it is impractical and impossible to use real-world environment because of the risk involved or because we need to accelerate processes that are not viable to do in the real-world. In the case of teaching and learning entrepreneurship knowledge and skills, the traditional way of using textbook and case studies in classroom does not provide students the opportunity to apply what they have learnt in class to real-life situations. In such case, the integration of ICT into the curriculum of entrepreneurship in the forms of computer simulation games and online collaborative tools can help to support the teaching and learning activities that would otherwise be difficult or impossible without the technology.

The author will share his experience leveraging a computer simulation game and an online tool for active collaborative learning of entrepreneurship by polytechnic students; facilitated by NYP lecturer. This project/presentation is based on the final year students from the Diploma in Business Informatics in the School of IT who read entrepreneurship module. SimVenture is the simulation game being used as an active learning platform that mimics real-life situation where students can safely apply what they have learnt and gain valuable experiences. The simulation facilitates students’ construction of entrepreneurship knowledge and encourages higher-order thinking skills and mastery in term of critical thinking, problem solving and making judgement.

The use of an online collaborative tool in the form of Canvaniser further engaged student for greater levels of interaction and collaboration among them. It also allows lecturer to track students’ progress to provide timely feedback on their work and learning. It provides a collaborative learning environment where students can interact and collaborate to brainstorm for business ideas, justify feasibility of their business model and outline potential market opportunity, all of which are higher-order thinking tasks which are important aspects of active collaborative learning. The tool also enhances realism and provides a launch pad for further exploration of entrepreneurship.

This improved pedagogy of active collaborative learning is significant to polytechnic education in Singapore where mastery of higher-order thinking skills require a platform where students can interact, collaborate, reflect, validate and safely apply what they have learnt.

Presenters
avatar for YAP TAT KWONG

YAP TAT KWONG

Course Manager, Nanyang Polytechnic
ICT-enhanced learning; active learning; flipped classroom; simulation games; entrepreneurship.


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm GMT+08
MR 335

2:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 7/9: 487 Redesigning Problem-Based Learning To Develop Students’ Comprehension Ability And Critical Thinking In The Learning Of Chinese Language
In conventional Chinese language (CL) teaching, teachers tend to place emphasis on teaching reading and writing skills through rote learning. As such learning process hinges on mechanical memory. This often results in students not finding the learning of CL interesting and engaging.

With greater emphasis on developing 21st Century Competencies (21CC), the CL teachers at Bukit View Secondary feel strongly that developing students’ critical thinking abilities will have a profound impact on students’ speaking, reading and writing skills.

In collaboration with Educational Technology Division, the team identified learning gaps in reading comprehension at Secondary One and adopted Problem-based learning (PBL) approach empowered with ICT for designing learning as researches have shown that PBL is an effective pedagogical approach to developing learners’ critical thinking (Chung & Chow, 2004; Hung, et al., 2008; Iwaoke & Rhee, 2010; Neo & Neo, 2005).

A curriculum intervention was designed to facilitate students on learning how to conduct problem analysis with scaffolds, assuming ownership to explore and solve the prescribed problem, and collaborating with peers to co-construct and revise ideas. Redesign for Assessing Critical Thinking (ReACT), an e-PBL portal was harnessed and integrated as part of the curriculum intervention.

During intervention, students worked in pairs to unpack the issues, analyse the characters and issues in the passage, and formulate ideas and recommendations through the five defined PBL process (identify, explore, analyse, apply and evaluate). The PBL process, influenced by the work of Lynch & Wolcott (2001), and supported with cognitive scaffolds (include Cognitive Research Trust Thinking strategies) were embedded within ReACT portal.

After two cycles of curriculum intervention, findings revealed an improvement in various aspects of comprehension ability and critical thinking skills. Students were able to analyse problems critically and identify issues from diverse perspectives. They were able to articulate their thinking and arguments with a certain degree of depth. They were also more engaged as they owned their learning.

Findings from this study suggested the necessity for CL teachers to look beyond the current way of lesson delivery. Furthermore, there exists value pondering about the intended student outcomes especially in the spirit of nurturing the younger generation to become confident and effective communicators who are ready to take on the world.



Presenters
JS

JIAN SHEN

Bukit View Secondary School
NB

NG BENG KEONG

Bukit View Secondary
NP

NG PIN LENG

Learning Partnership in Educational Technology Branch, Educational Technology Division


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm GMT+08
MR 336

2:00pm GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Learning Analytic Pte Ltd
Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

2:00pm GMT+08

Meet the Practitioners 6: Exploring ICT in Learning from Assessment (AfL) in Primary Mathematics
Limited Capacity seats available

Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm GMT+08
MR 332 Suntec City Convention Hall

2:00pm GMT+08

Model Lesson 10: 513 The Use of Animation in Teaching Literary Elements in the English Language and Literature Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

There are literary elements in the teaching of Literature and/or English Language that are traditionally more difficult for students to comprehend and express in their work, such as Tension and Humour. This is because students find it challenging to identify the strategies used by writers to achieve the intended effects on printed prose. Research in educational studies suggests that using visuals in teaching results in a greater degree of learning and understanding. The use of animation in the classroom helps students to identify literary techniques by distancing themselves from the traditional printed texts and accessing a familiar and less threatening form of text. The skill of recognising the creators’ strategies and intended effects are then more easily transferred to the analysis of the printed text. This presentation aims to equip participants with some ideas on how to use animation clips effectively in the classroom to enhance unseen prose discussions and other EL-based creative writing discussions. It also aims to explore how best to use such animation clips in the Character and Citizenship Education and/or SEL lessons.

In the session, participants will learn:

• What research suggests about the use of visuals such as animation, in the teaching and learning of Literature and/or English Language and/or SEL competencies/ Core moral values.

• How to use animation clips to enhance the teaching and learning of literary elements in the classroom.

• How to use animation clips to encourage discussion of SEL competencies and core values in the classroom.

Presenters
LT

LUISA TENG

Anglican High School



Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm GMT+08
MR 309 Suntec City Convention Hall

2:00pm GMT+08

Model Lesson 9: 544 Using Paper Clickers and QR Codes (PliCkers) to Close Learning Gaps
Limited Capacity filling up

In diagnosing and reviewing students’ learning, we want to move away from asking general questions such as ‘Do you understand? Do you have any questions?’ We strive to move towards asking specific questions that check for students’ understanding to close their learning gaps at different stages of the lesson. We also want to make a shift from teachers summing up their lessons in the last few minutes to setting aside closure time for students to articulate their understanding.

These are some of the areas the Mathematics team in CHIJ St Theresa's Convent are working on to address the learning gaps and the lack of confidence in low progress learners as part of the Improving Confidence and Numeracy (ICAN) project started by the Singapore Ministry of Education.

In enhancing the “diagnose” and “review” processes, the team experimented with using the ICT tool, Plickers. The tool allows teachers to collect real-time formative assessment data without the need for student devices. This allows teachers to spend more time addressing students’ learning gaps rather than use up time to set up the ICT tool. Each student is given a printed individual QR code. Depending on the direction in which the paper is turned, the student can then submit different responses to the question. It gives every student a voice in expressing their understanding without feeling conscious of giving a wrong answer publicly. This is particularly useful in building students’ confidence in learning Mathematics. When the teacher scans the students’ QR codes using a Plickers mobile application, every individual student’s response is captured. The data is saved in both individual and class formats for teachers to quickly identify the learning gaps and to address them immediately.

Participants will see examples of how assessment data has been used in actual lessons to adjust teaching strategies so as to close students’ learning gaps. Participants will also take away resources which integrate ICAN principles into the teaching of Mathematics, enhanced by the use of Plickers, in supporting low progress learners.

moderator: toh_wee_teck@moe.gov.sg  

Presenters
AE

AMUTHA ELANGOVAN

CHIJ St. Theresa's Convent
AC

AUDREA CHEANG

CHIJ St. Theresa's Convent
LZ

LEE ZHONG HAO ALWYN

CHIJ St Theresa's Convent
MF

MICHELE FUNG

CHIJ St. Theresa's Convent



Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm GMT+08
MR 308 Suntec City Convention Hall

2:00pm GMT+08

Spotlight 5: Jamie Neuwirth
Speakers
avatar for Jamie Neuwirth

Jamie Neuwirth

Regional Program Manager, Google Education
Jamie is a Regional Program Manager for Google Education and works with districts to successfully pilot, deploy, and scale Google tools like Apps for Education and Chromebooks. Previously, Jamie was a classroom teacher in Arkansas, and graduated from Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm GMT+08
Main Hall (404AX#,405BX - 406CX) Suntec City Convention Hall

2:00pm GMT+08

Spotlight 6: Victor Lim
Speakers
avatar for Victor Lim

Victor Lim

Deputy Director, Educational Technology Division, Ministry of Education, Singapore
Dr Victor Lim Fei is Lead Specialist & Deputy Director, Technologies for Learning, at the Educational Technology Division, Ministry of Education, Singapore. He is a multimodal discourse analyst and an educator. He is interested in different modes of knowledge representation as well... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm GMT+08
Hall 406D Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

Afternoon Tea Break
Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 8/1: 446 Read & Share @ “MyBookShop”
Limited Capacity seats available

21st Century Learners call for 21st Century Pedagogy. To engage 21st Century pupils effectively, schools need to actively innovate and adopt methods that promote Self-Directed Learning (SDL) and Collaborative Learning (CoL).

After adopting Taiwan’s approach towards cultivating the love of reading, in 2014, we collaborated with ETD and three other schools to embark on this project, designing our own approach and online platform suitable for our students. At the initial stage, teachers read with the students for 10 to 15 minutes during curriculum time (Modeled Sustained Silent Reading). This is to cultivate a good attitude and habit of reading. Once the habit of reading is formed, students engage in “book-talk”, where they share their views about the CL books they have read. To facilitate “book-talk” and book recommendations, students manage their own virtual bookshop in the “MyBookShop” online platform (MBS).

Students can recommend CL books that they like to their peers. They can view and comment on each other’s book recommendations by visiting their peers’ bookshops. Students’ interest towards reading has heightened. The virtual bookshop served as an engaging tool for students to exchange views and feedback on the books they have read, allowing them to sustain their interest in reading and sharing new books. This has also helped to improve their CL language use. In 2015, nine more schools have embarked on this project together with the original four schools.

Presenters
LC

LEE CHIA LIN

North Vista Primary School
LJ

LIU JIN

North Vista Primary School
WY

WANG YUN TING

North Vista Primary School
WL

WU LI HUA

North Vista Primary School


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
MR 327

3:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 8/2: 572 Using Design Principles To Design, Implement And Evaluate ICT-Enabled Pedagogical Practices
Limited Capacity seats available

As part of the eduLab programme, ETD’s learning designers work closely with teachers on eduLab projects to design, implement and evaluate ICT-enriched pedagogical practices that address learning issues pertinent to their classroom contexts. The pedagogical guidance provided by ETD’s learning designers is in line with the current emphasis in the education literature (e.g. Herrington & Reeves, 2011) to adequately support teachers in designing for learning, especially when it involves the use of new technologies to enhance classroom affordances and learning outcomes. During our 2-year collaboration with project teachers and NIE consultant Dr Manu Kapur, we explored the use of design principles to inform and shape the direction of the ICT-enriched pedagogical practices being developed as well as their implementation and testing in different classroom settings. These design principles explicate the “characteristics of a planned learning design (what it should look like), or its procedure (how it should be developed)” (Herrington, Herrington & Mantei, 2009). They serve to document our design knowledge (Kali, Levin-Peled & Dori, 2009) in terms of our successes and failures in adopting these ICT-enriched pedagogical practices. How we iteratively design, implement and evaluate our ICT-enriched practices with teachers is framed by the use of design principles in the following ways (Kapur & Bielaczyc, 2012; Herrington & Reeves, 2011): a) analyse the learning issue to gain insights on how a solution or practice can be designed to address it; b) search for existing design principles from the literature to guide the design of the practice; c) draft the initial design principles based on the literature and teachers’ practical knowledge; d) design the practice (i.e. activities, participation structures and social surround) based on the initial design principles; e) observe how variations in teacher actions (i.e. tied to the enactment of the practice and design principles) during lessons affect student learning and analyze the student data to understand the learning outcomes achieved; f) reflect on lesson design and implementation based on the analysis of teacher enactment data and student learning data; g) refine the design principles so that the design of the practice can be further improved for the next cycle of implementation. In this presentation, we will be sharing findings, challenges and learning points from our eduLab projects on the use of design principles to support teachers’ endeavours in harnessing technology for learning and teaching.

Presenters
CP

CHIA PEI XIAN

Ministry of Education
avatar for Cindy Ong

Cindy Ong

Senior Specialist, Ministry of Education
FS

FOO SEAU YOON

Ministry of Education
TX

Tan Xiao Ting

Ministry of Education


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
MR 328

3:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 8/3: 406 Designing Digital Resources for Teaching and Learning of the Humanities
Limited Capacity seats available

With the advent of the Internet, students and educators are engaging with learning resources beyond the traditional print. Therefore, there is an increasing need for the use of Information & Communication Technology (ICT) in schools to complement classroom pedagogies, so as to engage digital learners. In the market, there are many digital resources in the form of videos, simulations and info-graphics but these are not always easily accessible to the students as learners lack the curricular-based scaffolds to use these resources appropriately for self-directed learning. We posit that students’ learning experiences can be enhanced by the use of effective ICT-based pedagogies which are complementary to curricular-based digital resources. In this paper we propose a set of design guidelines in the development of digital resources for engaging school students in the learning of Humanities. Teachers may apply these guidelines to create and/or curate digital resources to support the teaching and learning of Humanities in Singapore.

Presenters
KK

KHOO KIM LIN CLARA-ANN

Ministry of Education
KW

KOH WEI NING

Ministry of Education
SK

SUNG KOK SIONG KENNETH

Ministry of Education


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
MR 329

3:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 8/4: 607 The Extent To Which Google Application Can Facilitate AfL In Oral Practice
Limited Capacity seats available

The Picture Discussion in the oral component in Chinese language, hones students’ ability to comprehend at the interpretative and evaluative levels. Students are expected to give fluent and coherent articulation of their interpretation. Currently the problem encountered by students is that there is no platform for them to review, receive and track their oral competencies. Moreover due to time constraint, teachers are not able to provide immediate feedback on their speaking skills.

To bridge this gap, a team of Mother Tongue teachers adopted Modified Teaching Model by May Chew (2007) with the help of Google Applications. Thus the project investigates the extent to which ICT-facilitated pedagogical approaches increases effective feedback in Assessment for Learning through self-directed online task in a typical class of about 40 students as compared to one without ICT facilitation.

A Google site was set up to serve as a platform with links to other ICTs tools (e.g Vocaroo, Youtube, Google Docs) that allows students to review and identify area for improvement for their speaking. The site also encourages self-directed learning. An assessment done at the end of the year proved that this is a viable pedagogy; improved student’s speaking skills greatly from the time before intervention.

As such, flipped classroom setting was created online first to ensure students’ master the techniques to Picture Discussion. Thereafter the teacher reinforced the techniques during lessons. Students were expected to record their speaking using Vocaroo, an online software. Students then would paste the link of their recordings onto Goggle Doc in Google Site. Subsequently teachers would provide constructive comments on students’ recordings using the Goggle Docs online. Students would be able to review the comments given by their teachers, and from then on, learn how to improve on it. Recordings of videos produced by the teachers that were uploaded onto Youtube were also linked to the Goggle Site so that students can conduct self-directed learning at home. They will compare their recordings to teachers’ recording and improve their speaking skills

Based on this new method of learning, it was found that both the Normal Academic and Express students performed better than the targeted results in their MT oral examination. SPSS results showed that this pedagogy adopted had helped the students to improve.

Moderators
avatar for ELAINE JEE

ELAINE JEE

Senior Educational Technology Officer, Ministry of Education
Elaine conducts classroom research on implementation principles for sustainable and scalable applications of ICT for enriched learning experiences. She has shared her findings at various international conferences. Elaine also promotes a culture of active experimentation and reflective... Read More →

Presenters
LD

LEOW DENG LI

COMPASSVALE SECONDARY SCHOOL
MT

MAUREEN THANG

Compassvale Secondary School
SW

SEE WEI LIANG

Compassvale Secondary School
ZW

ZHANG WEI

COMPASSVALE SECONDARY SCHOOL


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
MR 330

3:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 8/5: 616 ICT Infused Reading Programme In A Collaborative Setting
Limited Capacity seats available

It was observed that most NT students were disengaged while reading. Survey findings revealed their weak ability in word recognition to be the key cause for disengagement. This was in turn attributed to their weak vocabulary acquisition and oracy skills.

A Structured Reading Programme that infused ICT collaborative tools and English Language syllabus outcomes seamlessly was designed. Teachers wrote and chose texts with images for reading from the tablet, in tandem with the planned Scheme of Work and learning activities for the week. Lessons were facilitated by free technologies easily available in tablets. However, toggling between applications was time-consuming. The school resolved this issue by collaborating with Microsoft to develop a Reading Application(RA). An inbuilt dictionary allowed students to be self-directed learners who input new vocabulary into a collaborative document, all in just one application. The latter allowed teachers to track word learning, which happens incrementally, and students’ depth of understanding of the words (Dale 1965).  Text-to-speech function in the RA allowed students to learn the correct enunciation of the words too.

Student-selected, easy recording of the words in the tablets, at the class-level, gave students a sense of ownership over their work and nurtured their intrinsic desire to read. Students are also encouraged to use these words from their class vocabulary bank in their essays, which is monitored by the teachers. Students could link their reading activities to graded class assignments and this further motivated them to read. The students’ learning and behavioural attitudes are measured at the end of the program alongside vocabulary acquisition. Students became more active readers who made sense of the new vocabulary they encountered, in a collaborative manner. ICT was hence used to support knowledge construction in an exemplary way. The existing structure was also successfully adapted for a Special Needs programme which shows how adaptable this programme is.

Observations showed previously disengaged students, to be active, self-directed readers and more proficient in vocabulary acquisition. Plans are underway for other streams to participate. Assessment handouts will be shared on how the lessons fulfil the English Syllabus outcomes. Participants will learn how to integrate this technology easily into their lessons, and be introduced to the application which they can bring back to their school and adapt to their school’s needs. A Network could be formed with interested teachers to develop resources for the lessons and to develop the application further.

Presenters
CS

CHEN SI YUN

Ministry of Education, Singapore
JV

JAYAMANI VISWALINGAM

Fajar Secondary School
MD

MEENATCHI D/O RAMASAMY

Fajar Secondary
NF

NUR FAREESHA MAZLAN

Chestnut Drive Secondary School
SB

SALINA BINTE ISMAIL

Fajar Secondary


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
MR 333 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 8/6: 630 Analytics For Differentiated Teaching And Learning
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Fuhua Primary School brands herself as the Singapore SMART School of the Future. The school aims to provide a student-centric and values-motivated curriculum which develops the students holistically, harnessing technology to prepare the students to be future ready.

Learning analytics is the analysis and reporting of information within a digital learning product to reveal information and connections that can predict and advise on learning.

Recognising the different learning abilities of students and their diverse levels of understanding mathematical concepts, learning analytics provides students with suitable differentiated content to work on, keeping them attentive and interested and as a result, they are able to learn at their own pace and take charge of their own learning. The content recommended spans across grade levels so as to ensure that each student gets the advancement or remedial required.

Teachers in Fuhua Primary School leverage learning analytics to diagnose and surface learning gaps. With such insight, teachers can evaluate, analyse and improve on their teaching pedagogy; focus on addressing students’ identified needs in targeted areas in each topic and provide targeted feedback and focused remediation.

In this way, learning analytics empowers teachers to prioritise their limited time while providing personalised support for learning for every student in every class that they teach.

Presenters
FT

FINELLA TAN

Fuhua Primary School
HK

HO KOK SOON

HOD ICT, Fuhua Primary School
ICT person
PK

PHUA KIA WANG

Fuhua Primary School


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
MR 334

3:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 8/7: 579 WiRead
Limited Capacity seats available

Reading development is a critical component of strong language and literacy skills, which are in turn fundamental to young people’s productive participation in the 21st century global knowledge economy. However, teachers observe that students struggle to relate and respond to English language texts on a personal level, much less appreciate the literary merits of these texts. As a result, they often fail to engage deeply and critically in their reading tasks. These, in turn, bear adverse effects not only on students’ competencies in the language and literacy domain, but also their 21st century competencies, including critical thinking and communication, among others.

As part of its third FutureSchool Curriculum Innovation, Ngee Ann Secondary School is developing a web-based, computer-supported collaborative reading and learning diagnostics environment – WiRead. With WiRead, the team aims to explicitly develop students’ critical reading skills, deepen reading engagement levels and promote self-directed and collaborative knowledge construction in the literacy domain, both during and beyond formal classroom time. The tools in WiRead include a web-based, collaborative interactive reading tool, a personal learning dashboard and built-in learning analytics.

WiRead enhances the relevance and authenticity of the formal English curriculum and reading activities to students’ social lifeworlds. The core design of WiRead is underpinned by Vygotskian social constructivist and collaborative learning theories and multi-literacies pedagogical framework. WiRead provides rich, meaningful and timely formative feedback to students and teachers through contemporary learning analytics software to diagnose the social learning and critical reading dynamics amongst students.

WiRead has been used with Secondary 3 students during EL curriculum. They have enjoyed the sessions and have found the data from the learning analytics interesting and useful for their development. Teachers have observed improvement in the students’ quality of talk as well as heightened engagement and motivation. Other learning points include the need for students to increase their average usage to have better learning outcomes.

Presenters
avatar for Jennifer Pei-Ling Tan

Jennifer Pei-Ling Tan

Research Scientist (Creativity, 21st Century Literacies & Learning), National Institute of Education
Dr. Jen Tan is a Research Scientist and Assistant Dean (Knowledge Mobilisation) at the Office of Education Research in the National Institute of Education, Singapore. She specializes in techno-pedagogical and curriculum innovations aimed at assessing and fostering 21C literacies and... Read More →
MD

MUNEIRA DAUD

NGEE ANN SECONDARY SCHOOL
TS

TAY SIU HUA

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
YZ

YEO ZHONG WEI

Ngee Ann Secondary School


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
MR 335

3:00pm GMT+08

Paper Presentation 8/8: 632 Why Robots Will Still Need Us…
Limited Capacity seats available

Over the past 10 years, the digital revolution has displaced many manual tasks in our daily lives. From driverless cars to clever household gadgets, innovations that already exist could destroy jobs that have largely been untouched. Is the education industry immune to this tornado of change that is coming?

The new digital divide will be between those who know how to use technology and those who don’t; the latter will be left behind. As an educator of the future generation of users, it is important to speak the same language as your students to engage them. Spark joy in their learning and inspire them to develop the love for learning through the use of technological enhancements in the classroom.

Presenters
avatar for Suan Yeo

Suan Yeo

Head of Education, ANZ, Google


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT+08
MR 336

3:00pm GMT+08

Ed-Tech Sparkplug: Latize
Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
Hall 403 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

Model Lesson 11: 325 Integrating ICT for the Teaching and Learning of Comprehension (Malay)
Limited Capacity seats available

The ability to read and comprehend is important not only for lifelong learning, but also for adequate functioning in society. This model lesson seeks to demonstrate ways in which an ICT-integrated pedagogy can improve reading comprehension skills of second language learners at the primary level as well as promote their interest in the target language through an interactive environment. The learner-centred pedagogy is enhanced by the Internet-based technology to facilitate independent, differentiated learning as well as peer interaction and opportunity for collaboration.

Through this microteaching showcase, participants can experience how learners use networked computers to access extended reading materials in a centralised e-learning platform, all of which are specially designed to reinforce the respective lesson objectives. With thematic resources that focus on language use, the lessons provide ample opportunities for learners to consolidate and expand their learning, as well as develop their reading skills incrementally.

Central to the ICT-integrated pedagogy, is a 2-1-1 structure of activities crafted into the lesson. There are tuning-in activities or scaffolding activities that set the direction or guide learners to achieve the learning objectives or desired learning outcomes. This is supported with differentiated, extensive reading tasks which aim to provide more input to the acquisition of knowledge prior to the reading comprehension exercise that serves as an immediate application or outcome of learning.

Reading tasks are assigned based on learners’ ability, that is, clearly differentiated either in terms of the level of difficulty of the graded reading materials assigned or the number of reading materials expected to be read. As it is equally important to allow the learners to perform the tasks at their own pace, they could also be encouraged to track their own progression. This, in turn, inculcates the value or spirit of self-directed learning.

The use of online rubrics, comments and annotation functions as well as peer evaluation extends individual learning to a more situated type of learning as learners gather feedback from one another to refine their skills or to attain a higher level of proficiency. The affordance of the Internet-based technology can also be leveraged for collaborative learning when tasks are designed such that inputs from various members of a group are gathered and built-upon for successful completion of the tasks.

Indeed, there is an array of tools that serves to integrate essential learning outcomes, which through this microteaching showcase, participants can adopt or adapt to serve their learners.

moderator:  Hairul Bariyah Bte Maksom

Presenters
NB

NURHIDAYAH BINTE MOHD SALLEH

Ministry of Education
RB

RIDZWAN BIN JAMIL

Ministry of Education
SB

SURYANI BTE ATAN

Senior Specialist, EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, MOE HQ
ZM

ZUBAIDAH MAHAMOOD

Pioneer Primary



Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 308 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

Model Lesson 12: 631 Developing 21st Century Competencies In Students Through Hands-On Learning And Play
There is a growing recognition that people primarily think and learn through experience they have rather than abstract calculations and generalisations. We store our experiences in memory and use them to run simulations in our minds to prepare for problem solving in new situations. These simulations help us form hypotheses about how to proceed in the new situation based on past experiences.

So how can educators incorporate hands-on learning in schools today?

In LEGO Education, we believe that children must be supported to develop into systematic creative learners, active learners and collaborative learners. Learning in the twenty-first century is about providing children the opportunity to experiment with their surroundings as a form of problem solving. It is all about improvisation and discovery, constructing dynamic models of real world processes and interacting with meaningful tools that expand mental capacities. It is about being active, creative and collaborative.
This session will engage participants in hands-on activities and show examples of how LEGO Education’s approach to learning can be put into practice. We will build and experiment, discuss the professional content of the sharing materials and their relevance, and last but not least, participants can learn how to have a good time planning how to engage their learners!

Presenters
LF

LEMVIGH FOG

LEGO Education, Billund



Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
MR 309 Suntec City Convention Hall

3:00pm GMT+08

Panel Discussion 3: Developing Students into Responsible Digital Citizens
Limited Capacity seats available

With increasing use of digital technologies in and outside school, the digital world expands and integrates into various aspects of our lives. The digital footprints we left behind impact internet privacy, reputation, trust, and security. Being responsible digital citizens is critical in this age as we need to learn effectively, work efficiently and participate fully in a digitally mediated world. Do our students understand their roles and responsibilities in the digital society? How can schools help our students become responsible digital citizens and make a positive presence, both online and offline?

Hear from a panel of experts share on the youth behaviours in the Internet, and how students can be good and responsible digital citizens and educators’ role in guiding students to create a safer and healthy digital world for themselves and others.

Moderators
avatar for Ong Kong Hong

Ong Kong Hong

Director, Curriculum Policy Office, Ministry of Education, Singapore
Mr Ong Kong Hong, Director of Curriculum Policy Office (CPO) in MOE, leads the Office in charting the direction for the national curriculum, and facilitating effective curriculum, pedagogy and assessment practices, so as to bring about quality teaching and learning in schools. Before... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Devorah Heitner

Devorah Heitner

Founder, Raising Digital Natives
Devorah Heitner, PhD, Founder and CEO of Raising Digital Natives, is an experienced keynote speaker, workshop leader and consultant. She serves as a digital citizenship policy advisor to numerous public and independent schools. Dr. Heitner has spoken at Google Chicago, SXSWedu, TEDx, ISTE, the Family Online Safety Institute and The National Digital... Read More →
avatar for Nicholas Lim

Nicholas Lim

Director, Youth Development and Education at Emergenetics International-Asia Pacific
Mr Nicholas Gabriel Lim is Director of Youth Development and Education at Emergenetics International-Asia Pacific. He holds a Masters Degree in Applied Psychology from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, and is a Registered Psychologist with, and a Board Member of the Singapore... Read More →
avatar for Aaron Maniam

Aaron Maniam

Director, Ministry of Trade and Industry
Mr Aaron Maniam has received many accolades: Asia Society’s “Asia 21 Young Leaders’ (2006), the Orchid Jayceettes of Singapore’s “Outstanding Young Singaporean (2011), the Singapore Youth Award (2012), and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader (2013), just to name a... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
Hall 406D Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 136 Digital Journaling in Design and Technology
When generating ideas to solve design problems, Design & Technology (D&T) students working on their own may not fully benefit at the problem identification and ideation stages in the design process . At times, their ideas are limited in variety and lacking in exploration to adequately propose suitable ideas that meet the user’s needs and the design specifications.



This presentation aims to share the experience of carrying out an eduLab project between the project teachers from three Singapore secondary schools and the officers from Educational Technology Division, Ministry of Education.



The innovation draws on studies in Knowledge Building (KB) to guide their students to generate ideas, build-on, and improve their ideas (So et al., 2010; Zhang, Hong, Scardamalia, Teo, & Morley, 2011.) In addition, the works by Hong, Zhang, Teo, & Scardamalia (2009) and Zhang et al. (2011) inform the teachers on the significance of using scaffolds in designing lessons that guide students to generate ideas in their D&T lessons and to collaboratively comment on each other’s ideas to improve their initial ideas with a digital tool, and to support the adoption of KB. Specifically, the innovative lesson design framework facilitates teachers’ efforts to design learning activities, student participation structures, and the social and cultural norms in the classroom that use technology to support students working with ideas (Kapur & Bielaczyc, 2012).



The practice gives students opportunities to be exposed to other perspectives and thus encouraged to be more exploratory in the ideation stage. Students have demonstrated that meaningful comments help them to address their learning gaps.




Presenters
AC

ANDREW CHAN CHUN YAN

Fuchun Secondary School
TY

TANG YULING

Marsiling Secondary School
YC

YAP CHEE PING ANTHONY

YISHUN TOWN SECONDARY SCHOOL


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 246 Predicting Performance using Smart Data from E-Learning for Timely Intervention
Teachers have the task of ploughing through data of the class(es) they teach in efforts to create for their pupils a “personalised education program designed to maximise education outcomes.”

“They (teachers) have always been data workers – assessing students’ understanding of the material based on test scores, classroom engagement, quality of homework, etc., with the goal of improving that understanding” (Olavsrud, T).

In Wellington, aside from monitoring pupils’ daily assignments and their class participation rates, teachers often race against time at the end of an exam in each term collating data for Item Analysis purposes for each subject in order to identify questions that pupils have performed weakly on so as to remediate after the exam. The problem with this is that data gathered from such analysis provides information only after the exam. Remediation helps the pupils only in the next exam.

What is needed is a faster and more effective means of identifying weak topics so that intervention can be done earlier to help pupils’ scores prior to the exams in each term. Online resources have largely been an under-utilised method of data gathering for this purpose. According to Putnam & Borko, “…multimedia systems, with their new and flexible ways of representing and connecting information, can enable teachers to explore unfamiliar pedagogical practices and various problems of pedagogy.”

Hence, we did a study with the purpose to find a platform that enables teachers to identify topics that their pupils are weak in so that they can conduct intervention and remediation to improve their pupils’ understanding of these topics before their exam.

As such, the intervention meted by team were using online competitions and personalised e-learning activities to encourage pupils to do more Mathematics practices and measuring monthly participation and proficiency report to monitor the performance of each class and identify pupils’ weak topics.

We thus, Welington uses e-learning (Koobits) results to predict the performance can be used effectively and is a new opportunity for teachers to discover problems earlier and intervene to help students.

To illustrate, in the case of class 4D, the snapshot of e-learning results at the end of March 2015 showed a 90% correlation to the upcoming performance of pupils for SA1 in the next month. Combined with the matrices that will be shared with participants, the prediction accuracy was up to 95%. Do come and join in the presentation to be more enlightened.


Presenters
KJ

KAREN JUDE KOEK

Wellington Primary School
ML

MADELEINE LIM

Wellington Primary School
MI

MOHAMAD IDRIS ASMURI

Wellington Primary School
avatar for Mr. Roslee bin Jalie

Mr. Roslee bin Jalie

HOD ICT, WELLINGTON PRIMARY SCHOOL
Roslee Bin Jalie is the HOD ICT of Wellington Primary School and has been teaching for twenty years. His work in the area of Flipped Classroom started in early 2012 but he has gone on to share on various local and international platform. He uses a variety of tools along such as the... Read More →
SR

SITI ROHAIYAH MOHAMED

Wellington Primary


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 516 Using ICT and 'DOUHAO' Newspaper to Learn the Skill of Giving Opinions
This ICT lesson is about how to use the articles in "DOUHAO" newspaper to conduct CL lessons. To help students be more aware of current issues, it is important that we can find effective way to use this newspaper. This lesson consists of 2 sessions (70 mins). The objectives are to equip students with the skills of giving opinions using ICT in the self-directed and collaborative way. Session one: study comments in newspaper. Each student in the same group has a different comment on the same topic. As a group, they find out 2 new words they have learnt through the passages and submit through "Answer Garden". This ICT tool allows the words which most students choose became more obvious. Students will in the end learn some popular new words together. Next, students will study the comments and paraphrase it through "Padlet". This ICT tool allows students to see other groups' sharing, and learn from each other. Session two: Students learn how to give opinions with the guide of a given checklist. The checklist on how to give good opinions is in a google form with a box below for students to fill up their opinions. In the end, students may self-assess their groups' opinions by ticking the items in the checklist. Teacher will share each group's opinion for students to vote for a best opinion. The lesson feedback from students is positive. Students prefer to learn using ICT and they believe they are able to master the teaching and learning objectives more effectively.

Presenters
ZH

ZHAO HAI PING

Ahmad Ibrahim Secondary


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 562 Digital Media Creators of the Future - Fun with Coding
In 2014, Cedar Primary School became one of the pilot schools to step foot into the uncharted territory of computer programming for primary school pupils which was then known as “Fun with Coding”.



“Fun with Coding” essentially exposes pupils to the world of basic computer coding through the use of Scratch, a visual programming authoring tool. The vibrant interface of Scratch coupled with friendly drag-and-drop controls provides an enriching and inviting introduction for young children into the potentially daunting world of computer programming.



Through a weekly 60-minute session that runs for a total of 8 weeks, the primary 4 and 5 pupils learnt important strategies used for solving problems and formulating solutions in the domain of computational thinking.



Pupils need to use their analytical thinking together with their arsenal of tools ranging from simple animation to the complex use of conditional statements that eventually led them to design a solution to tackle the problems – such as making a perfectly running game much tougher or designing an app that makes everyday choices for the users etc. With the teacher acting as a facilitator, the pupils are highly encouraged to be independent learners and to persevere in the debugging process while trying different ways to approaching problems.



The lesson design also takes into consideration the uniqueness of each individual and their different learning pace. When pupils complete their tasks, they would be given additional tougher challenges where more variables are involved and less guidance is provided. With this differentiated approach, most, if not all, pupils can enjoy a rewarding coding experience and are also spurred on by their peers’ achievements.



With the knowledge acquired for coding, pupils also advocate cyber wellness values via the creation of the games using the codes. An example would be creating a short story with character dialogues that teach the pupils on how to behave properly on the Internet.



One of the greatest challenges in the implementation of the programme is to find the time and space to fit it inside the already packed curriculum. The school has effectively used the total curriculum to develop pupils in the learning of coding.



With the teachers as the facilitators and ICT executive as the trainer, the ICT Department has mapped out the development plans of the pupils from P4-P6, aiming to develop pupils to become competent digital media creators of the future.



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Presenters
FY

FOO YONG CHIN IVAN

Cedar Primary School
NT

NICHOLAS TAN

Cedar Primary School
SL

SANDY LIM

Cedar Primary School


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 578 Smarter School: Using ICT to Improve Work Processes
This project has been awarded the MOE Innergy Commendation Award in 2015, the 2014 MIB Thematic Challenge "Improving Work Process" and SPA In-House IQC Assessment 2015.



There is a rising global trend of using Data analytics in many industries to enable organisations in making better business decisions. Yet, the use of such an approach in schools has generally been lacking. Schools typically have broad masses of data, ranging from students’ academic grades/progress, attendance, character-development indicators to data pertaining to teachers’ training, appraisal, satisfaction etc. But there is no concerted and standardised approach in the collection, archiving and analysis of this information to enhance operational workflow and processes in schools.



With the pervasiveness of technology in Singapore schools and a growing desire for more open data and information from stakeholders, e.g. students, teachers, parents, teacher-leaders and school leaders, there are a lot of opportunities for better data gathering and analysis in schools. Starting with People, the stakeholders (e.g. What will benefit teachers and their students?) and what they Value, school workflow/processes are re-designed, empowered by Systems and Technology that will Impact value-change in them and provide Analytics to inform them as well. We keenly believe in a people-centric process whereby people and what they value is critical. Their values will drive behaviour that reinforces a school culture where these shared values are practised coherently and consistently. Data input and collation is achieved by commonly available online tools, i.e. Google Sheets and Forms. Google Apps Scripts is used to enable data-flow and work process automation. Data from the stakeholders are consolidated and shared with other stakeholders regularly and in a timely manner. The data are further analysed, and serve to inform and drive appropriate behaviour from stakeholders. An example is a reflective teacher practitioner (value) who initiates quality personal reflection (behaviour 1) and builds collaborative knowledge (behaviour 2) via an Integrated Academic Curriculum Analytic and Review system, which in turn promote a sustainable school-wide environment encouraging innovation and professional development (Culture). Similarly, an engaged parent (value) will provide timely and strong support (behaviour 1) to monitor their children in partnership with the school (behaviour 2) via an Academic Calendar system, reinforcing a conscientious learning culture. Some other key processes also include student leadership development and staff training. Through this approach, the school is able to leverage on ICT to simplify its work processes and reinforce desired values and culture in its stakeholders.

Presenters
JW

JOHN WU

Anglo-Chinese School (Barker Road)
TH

TOH HUN KHIM

Anglo-Chinese School (Barker)


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

3:30pm GMT+08

e-Poster Exhibition: 581 Creating Conditions, Building Culture: Leveraging Technology and Date to Transform Character and Cognitive Holistic Assessment and Management for Developing Future Ready Student
In Catholic High School, we believe in a student-centred holistic education to groom our students to be future-ready and caring citizens. The school has developed processes with a system, the Character and Cognitive Holistic Assessment and Management Programme for Students (C2HAMPS), to leverage data mining and data-driven decision making for designing regular, timely and effective improvements and enhancement to our CCE teaching and learning, so as to ensure a student-centric and personalised programme that addresses the socio-emotional needs of our students.



C2HAMPS is a set of human processes, infrastructure and use-anywhere mobile app and desktop software system to collect, analyse and utilise student development data on just-in-time and also scheduled basis. In CHS, CCE lessons are customised for the levels and classes based on the student profiles reported in C2HAMPS, and student well-being survey data collected on a semestral basis. Based on the data collected, the CCE team customises the CCE curriculum, including class/level lessons and breakfast sessions (personalised mentorship) to groom our students into our vision outcomes of leaders, gentlemen and bilingual scholars.



The data collected is used at several platforms. School leaders and the Middle Managers use the data to monitor the overall holistic development of each level, and adjust the programme according to level needs. For example, based on the feedback on students’ behavioural attributes given by the form teachers via C2HAMPS, CCE team maps out the schedule and curriculum for the following year. Teachers also use the data to review the development of each student and to provide effective guidance when necessary during platforms such as our weekly Morning Breakfast Session with students. Through these conditions of pervasive processes and provision of infrastructure, the school builds a caring culture that exemplifies the school value of doing everything with love.



Participants would be able to

(i) Understand the processes of C2HAMPS

(ii) See tangible examples, including C2HAMPS reports, of how the school uses C2HAMPS to monitor student development by level (Middle Managers)

(iii) How teachers make use of C2HAMPS to show care and concern

(iv) Understand how Catholic High School build our culture of love

Presenters
CC

CAROL CHONG XING LE

Catholic High School (Secondary)
TE

TAN EE SIN

Catholic High School


Thursday March 31, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT+08
FutureSpace Suntec City Convention Hall

4:00pm GMT+08

Keynote 4: Ng Pak Tee
Speakers
avatar for Ng Pak Tee

Ng Pak Tee

Associate Professor, National Institute of Education Nanyang Technological University
Associate Professor Ng Pak Tee teaches in the programs for school leaders (Principal-ship and Head-of-Department-ship), postgraduate programs for research candidates (Master, EdD and PhD) and in the foundation programs for trainee teachers.Associate Professor Ng is currently the Executive... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm GMT+08
Main Hall (404AX#,405BX - 406CX) Suntec City Convention Hall

5:00pm GMT+08

Closing Ceremony
Thursday March 31, 2016 5:00pm - 5:30pm GMT+08
Main Hall (404AX#,405BX - 406CX) Suntec City Convention Hall
 

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